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The Kettericks: Mr. K. was a fifty year old cross between Ross Brachett and Freddie Finch, in the business of "finance," as he put it. Said one of his associates is Irving Langmuir's brother. Mr. K. was my most frequent horseshoe opponent, he and Taft, "the fat men", playing Campbell and me, "the thin men." Mrs. K. was a sweet faced woman in the late forties I should judge, looking almost too old to be the mother of Carol, their nine year old, who tried so hard to be nice to Bab only to be gently shunned frequently; I felt sorry for her. Ketterick was an extremely sociable and friendly man, New Yorker, and seemed to do his best to be agreeable. He was full of fun and won the "Big Apple" contest at the dance. He appeared to be a man of money but self made and sans much education  - more self educated also. I really enjoyed him very much. Some said they were Catholics.

The Byers: The Byers are from Buffalo and left only a few days after we arrived. He was a round faced rather husky fellow in the 30's, and looked like Dr. Merriman with a faint Chinese caste to his face. Byers was ready for anything and was one of the instigators of the dance and an enthusiast for the "Soldier's Joy" as well as other square dances. His wife was plump, pretty dark and rather quiet.

The Atwells: Dr. and Mrs. Atwell and their 6 year old daughter, Jean Carol, who looked like David Miller but without Davy's mean expression and was awfully cute - happy, jolly youngster, never perturbed about anything apparently and a good little dancer.

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