Viewing page 111 of 122

[[image No. 144 (on previous page) - black & white photograph of Paul Studenski at the controls of a biplane]]
[[caption]]  Studenski was a little galaxy of greatness who learned to fly at the Old World school of Bierliot in France. Journeying to the U.S., he became a citizen, spending his life as a well known economic specialist. During the years before World War I, he was an electric influence flying in Texas and Illinois, but especially in such wayside regions as Kansas and Montana. Like so many of his contemporaries, Studenski enjoyed a Good Luck companion while he flew, in this case a little American Indian doll, always smiling.[[/caption]]

[[image No. 145 (on previous page) - black & white photograph of Glenn Hammond in a 1909 Curtiss]]
[[caption]] Glenn Hammond Curtiss at the controls of a 1909 Curtiss, about to touch down at Mineola, Long Island. The engineering talent of Curtiss was phenomenal and he was forever pressing forward with new designs and concepts.[[/caption]]

[[image No. 146 (on previous page 110) - black & white photograph of Thomas Baldwin at the controls of his biplane]]
[[caption]]Thomas Baldwin in his epic Red Devil, a craft of his own design. "Uncle Tom" was the patron of dozens of important early pilots and aviation projects.[[/caption]]

[[image No. 147 - black & white photograph of Vincent Burnelli in front of an airplane]]
[[caption]]Vincent J. Burnelli, a Temple, Texas, boy, was one of the great talents of American aviation, a genius at technology and design. He was design engineer on the Lawson, the world's first real airliner, built in Milwaukee, 1919, where Vince is seen in a happy stance. Burnelli pioneered the concept of the lifting body in important later work.[[/caption]]

[[image No. 148 - black & white photograph of Howard Huntingon flying his arched wing aircraft]]
[[caption]]Howard Huntingon flying his "Gull," 1913, a unique design of arched wings, was typical of the quest for airborne individuality.[[/caption]]

[[image No. 149 - black & white photograph of a ticket for an aeroplane ride]]

[[image No. 149 text]]
[[underlined]] PRICE. $5.00 [[underlined]]
THIS TICKET AND TWENTY DOLLARS ARE GOOD FOR
ONE RIDE ANY SUNDAY AFTERNOON IN
APRIL, 1912, WITH

TURPIN OR PARMELEE
-- IN THEIR -- 
AEROPLANE AT VENICE

COUNTERSIGNED

[[signature line]]
PASSENGER AGENT

[[/signature line]]
MANAGER
[[/text]]

[[image No. 150 - black & white photograph of James Turpin (on right) in front of biplane]]

[[caption for Images 149 & 150]] James Clifford Turpin, a Dayton, Ohio-born pilot of consummate skill and creative flair, was one of the original Wright Exhibition team members, with Phil Parmelee. He commanded high fees for his excellence, was in constant demand. His plane was used for the aerial wedding, at the Los Angeles Aviation Meet, 1912. A beaming Turpin at far left, in his tailored flight jacket.[[/caption]]

Transcription Notes:
mandc: Note that the photo captions for 145, 146, and 147 on this page 111 refer to the photos on the previous page 110.

Please note that the language and terminology used in this collection reflects the context and culture of the time of its creation, and may include culturally sensitive information. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution, but is available in its original form to facilitate research. For questions or comments regarding sensitive content, access, and use related to this collection, please contact transcribe@si.edu.