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Change in Procedures for Collections of the National Collection of Fine Arts and the National Portrait Gallery Commissions

Mr. Ripley reminded the Regents that at their meeting on January 28, 1980, a question was raised regarding the Regents' procedures currently being followed in connection with the acquisition and disposition of works of art for the National Collection of Fine Arts and the National Portrait Gallery. The problem has been the presentation of as many as 94 pages of lists of purchases, accessions, gifts and bequests of various works of art for the approval of the Board of Regents.

Mr. Ripley suggested that the integrity of the collections can be maintained and yet preclude the need for Regents' consideration and approval by delegating this authority to the Secretary, as in most other cases. It should be noted that the Commissions are composed of experts in various fields and are appointed by the Regents. Furthermore, the Board of Regents prescribes the procedures for these Commissions, including any proposed amendments, and also reserves to itself approval of special conditions.

In order to provide for this delegation of authority to the Secretary, it was proposed that the procedures contained in the Bylaws of the National Collection of Fine Arts Commission and the Functions of the National Portrait Gallery be amended. The following motion was approved by the Regents:

[[indented]] VOTED that the Board of Regents delegates to the Secretary authority for approving accessions and disposition of works of art for the National Collection of Fine Arts and the National Portrait Gallery, in accord with policies and procedures laid down by the Board of Regents, and requests the Commissions to submit revised bylaws to the Board's January 1981 meeting. [[/indented]]
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