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six (6) night, with a enrollment of sixty six hundred and thirty five (6635) pupils, and an average attendance of fifty-one hundred and thirty-six (5136).  No. of teachers one hundred and twenty-six (126) all except ten of whom are colored.  Of these pupils 592 are in the alphabet, 3670 spell and read easy lessons, and 2373 are advanced readers.  There are 1643 studying geography, 312 arithmetic, 2980 writing, and 325 higher branches.  Four schools are reported in Talbot County.  One hundred and twenty-one of the school-houses are owned by freedmen, which, in most cases, they were aided in building by this Bureau.

The schools are sustained in part by Northern benevolent societies, and in part by freedmen, they receive no aid from the State.  The societies pay teachers salaries and in many instances furnish them with transportation to and from their fields of labor, while the freedmen are required to pay teachers board and incidental expenses of the schools.  These societies are allowed rental at the rate of ten dollars per month, by this Bureau, for all their schools which have an average attendance equal to or exceeding thirty pupils.

Very Respectfully, Yours
W. L. VanDerlip
Bvt. Major and Supt of Education
per J. Q. Crosby

P.S.
Please find enclosed reports.


748

Bureau R.F. and A.L.
Office Supt. of Education D.C.
Washington, March 21st 1870.

[[underlined]] Price  Thomas H. [[/underlined]] 
Philadelphia, Pa.

Dear Sir,

How would you like to take the school at Pisgah, Charles Co. Md. for the remainder of the term?  It is a good school, under proper management, and I think you would find the accommodations equal to those at Oakville.  Col. Corson writes that he is willing to employ you, and I hope you will call on him.  Please write me at once whether you accept or not.  You can go from here every day per Steamer to Glymont and thence by stage.

Very Respectfully, Yours
W. L. VanDerlip
Bvt. Major and Supt of Ed.
per J. Q. Crosby

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[[start page]]

749

Bureau R.F. and A.L.
Office Supt. of Education D.C.
Washington, March 21st 1870.

[[underlined]] Perkins  Mr. William. [[/underlined]] 
Chestertown, Md.

Dear Sir,

Yours of the 18th Inst. is at hand.  If the people where Mr. Ball is teaching can furnish a room for the school, and can keep up an average attendance of thirty pupils, the teacher can remain, if not he must go to another place without delay.  Do you know of a place where a good school can be gathered?  George E. Adams of Centerville, writes that a teacher is wanted at Spanish Neck, and one at Pine Neck.  If you know of no better location have him report to Mr. Adams.

I will write you again and inform you as to what aid can be rendered in rebuilding the house.

Very Respectfully, Yours
W. L. VanDerlip
Bvt. Major and Supt of Ed.
per J. Q. Crosby


750

Bureau R.F. and A.L.
Office Supt. of Education D.C.
Washington, March 21st 1870.

[[underlined]] Somers  Isaiah W. [[/underlined]] 
Forktown, Md.

Dear Sir

You should order books of Messrs Cushings and Bailey, 262 Baltimore St. Baltimore.  They will send them according to your directions and [[underlined]] at your [[/underlined]] risk, and the amount of the bill will be deducted from your salary.  When you send your order you must enclose this letter.

We have no printed rules for school government.

Very Respectfully, Yours
W. L. VanDerlip
Bvt. Major and Supt of Ed.
per J. Q. Crosby

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