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00:31:37
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Transcription: [00:31:37]
{SPEAKER name="Gordon Ekholm"}
--vertical faces in the soil. Get the rock out from underneath and then, go back and make another cut so that we were able to say quite certainly that this was a 1 period site.

[00:31:50]
{SPEAKER name="Gordon Ekholm"}
We found nothing of earlier or later periods. Then at the, after finishing that work, we went to the site of [[Pamlico ??]] which had appeared in our survey,

[00:32:02]
{SPEAKER name="Gordon Ekholm"}
and it proved to be an extraordinarily rich site, covering a long period of time from the, from the pre-Classic right up to the time of the Spanish Conquest, I believe.

[00:32:13]
And, it's - it proved to be one of the most complete, uh--

[00:32:23]
{SPEAKER name="Gordon Ekholm"}
stratifications I think that has been found anywhere in middle America.

[00:32:32]
{SPEAKER name="Gordon Ekholm"}
It's a river-side site that had been built up through not only the cultural debris, but through the building of a natural levy. So that there was considerable depth,

[00:32:47]
{SPEAKER name="Gordon Ekholm"}
and a rather complete separation of the various horizons at the site. About a sequence of 6 periods,

[00:33:03]
{SPEAKER name="Gordon Ekholm"}
which have been, have been-- have held up very well in further work in the area.

[00:33:15]
{SPEAKER name="Gordon Ekholm"}
Actually we did not get the earliest material in our particular dig because a number of years later [[McNiche ??]] went back and found in the riverbank a still earlier series of deposits and was able to carry back from our earliest level

[00:33:37]
{SPEAKER name="Gordon Ekholm"}
the occupation of the site to the very early pre-Classic, considerably earlier--

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