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00:15:46
00:17:52
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Transcription: [00:15:46]

{SPEAKER name="Gordon Ekholm"}
archaeology was primarily a uh, an attempt to work out sequences and slowly develop knowledge of a field. There was--there was little real theoretical understanding, it seems to me, of what- of what we were doing.
[00:16:15]
At least, I feel now that there relatively little theoretical understanding of how we were attempting to connect these areas in Mexico and in the southwest and southeast.
[00:16:25]

{SPEAKER name="Shirley Gorenstein"}
Do you think that might have had something to do with the fact that you really had very little substantive data to work with?

{SPEAKER name="Gordon Ekholm"}
Yes, that's - that's - that's true. We were actually, in a sense, pioneering an area, which - in areas, which were unknown. We had a general idea of what might be found in these areas but no-one had done any actual work in these intervening areas.
[00:16:55]
It was a question of exploring to see what was to be found and that was basically it. 'Go see what you find and see what it means.'
[00:17:03]


{SPEAKER name="Shirley Gorenstein"}
But a great deal of energy and time and, and work was spent on 'go see what you find' that there was practically nothing left over for 'and see what it means.'

{SPEAKER name="Gordon Ekholm"}

Yeah, yeah, yeah.
[00:17:19]

{SPEAKER name="Shirley Gorenstein"}
And I think even that there might also have been not enough to, not enough substantive data to see what it means because I think there has to be a period in which that's collected.

{SPEAKER name="Gordon Ekholm"}

Um--[[long pause]]
[00:17:39]

{SPEAKER name="Shirley Gorenstein"}
..or was this that period in Mexican archaeology?

{SPEAKER name="Gordon Ekholm"}
Well, Mexican archaeology at this time was, was beginning to come out of a long period of
[00:17:53]

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