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{SPEAKER name="JAN BUTTERFIELD"}
-- straight As to get in there. And there are gifted children - I was talking to Reena Branston because her youngest daughter goes there, my daughter goes there, my daughter's not happy with it --

[00:02:24]
They're not set up to teach creative children. We have no place for those special children.

[00:02:30]
And that your parents recognized that, and instead of whipping you with it said OK, you know --

{SPEAKER name="UNKNOWN"}
Maybe they didn't know what to do with him - [[laughter]]

[00:02:38]
{SPEAKER name="JAN BUTTERFIELD"}
Maybe in desperation they - [[cross]] - dropped him off at the door and said, "Go find some --"

{SPEAKER name="ANSEL ADAMS"}
That's quite true. -- That is quite true.

[00:02:44]
{SPEAKER name="UNKNOWN"}
Very interesting.

{SPEAKER name="ANSEL ADAMS"}
Well I would say, I mean, I don't know if I've given you what you want at all.

[00:02:49]
You can continue this any time you want. Not that I'm cutting you off now, but I mean that [[inaudible]]

[00:02:54]
{SPEAKER name="JAN BUTTERFIELD"}
No, I'm interested, I'm interested in --

{SPEAKER name="ANSEL ADAMS"}
Whether I'm following your questions, or not. I don't want to intrude--

[00:02:58]
{SPEAKER name="JAN BUTTERFIELD"}
I'm interested in how those things, I'm very much interested in how people develop. I've gotten very interested in, let's say, familial situation. What family situation allows an artist to exist, instead of stepping on him?

[00:03:10]
What kind of situation-- How come we have such a high percentage of artists from middle-class families--? Now you happen to have had a different situation where there was a whole pattern of artistic involvement -

[00:03:24]
- but many families, middle-class families, with no art involvement at all and some strange child springs up like a flower in a field, you know -- And either somebody steps on that child before he's 10 or 11, --

[00:03:36]
-- or somebody is sensitive enough to say "wait a minute, that's, maybe that's something -"

{SPEAKER name="ANSEL ADAMS"}
Or exaggerates. You know, little kid --

{SPEAKER name="JAN BUTTERFIELD"}
-- and makes --

{SPEAKER name="ANSEL ADAMS"}
-- played to the house, down in Carmel the piano. Very gifted, but the family wants to kind of promote him.

[00:03:49]
{SPEAKER name="JAN BUTTERFIELD"}
That's terrible.

{SPEAKER name="ANSEL ADAMS"}
Because they are, they're just crazy about him. I tell them, "Leave him alone, let him be normal. Let him take it--" Remember that had...

{SPEAKER name="JAN BUTTERFIELD"}
And then they become obnoxious little children - [[laughter]]

[00:03:59]
{SPEAKER name="ANSEL ADAMS"}
Well, I've been to Calvert, an obnoxious prodigy you know.

[00:04:02]
{SPEAKER name="JAN BUTTERFIELD"}
But then after you spent all that time in the fair, then you had Maybeck design a house. That's interesting.

{SPEAKER name="ANSEL ADAMS"}
Yeah.

{SPEAKER name="JAN BUTTERFIELD"}
That's interesting.

[00:04:09]
{SPEAKER name="UNKNOWN"}

'Cause those were extraordinary buildings, those buildings.

{SPEAKER name="ANSEL ADAMS"}
Well, let's, that's, that place, I went there --

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