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PHOTOCOPIED October 2, 2002:  NASM PRESERVATION COPY

[[newspaper clipping]]
18 Chinese and US Military Chiefs Make Inspection of Matsu Islands

A group of 18 Chinese and American military leaders, headed by Minister of National Defense Yu Ta-wei, flew to Matsu yesterday for a whirlwind inspection of the defense setup on the Island group.

The party included Chinese Air Force Commander General Wang Shu-ming, Deputy Chief of MAAG Brigadier General Edwin Walker, Deputy Chief of the Formosa Liaison Center Brigadier General Harold Grant, Deputy Chief of the U.S. 13th Air Force Brigadier General Benjamin O. Davis, and others.

Yesterday's represented Minister Yu's sixth visit to Matsu after his inauguration as Defense Minister several months ago.  Aside from listening to briefings by Matsu garrison commanders on the island's defense, Minister Yu and his party also witnessed a military exercise staged by the Matsu defenders.

The American visitors were reported to be deeply impressed by the high morals and combat ability of the frontline soldiers.  Minister Yu told the press after the inspection "Each time I visited Matsu, I found that some new progress had been made."

General Wang Shu-ming also took the opportunity to make an on the spot inspection of the CAF ground personnel stationed at that island outpost.  He highly commended the loyalty and courage demonstrated by CAF officers in fighting for the cause of this nation.

The party flew to Matsu yesterday morning and returned here at 7:30 p.m. the same day.  In the course of the visit, Minister Yu inspected a tiny rocky island only 8,000 meters from Communist bases and viewed the mainland coasts through binoculars.
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