Viewing page 33 of 54

Original scanned October 1, 2002.  Reduced print (front page only) - for complete newspaper, see Davis Box 163, Folder

[[newspaper clipping]]

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China Post
英文中國郵報

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Vol. 3, No. 1906[[?]] 

[[string of Chinese characters, too muddied in scan to make out past a few numbers]]

Taipei, Saturday, June 11, 1955

[[string of Chinese characters, too muddied in scan to read]]
NT$ 1.00

US Gov't Initials Agreement For Sale Of Atom Reactor, Uranium To Geneva

Washington. June 19 (CNA.UP) The U.S. Government announced today that it has initiated an agreement with Switzerland whereby it will sell to that government an atomic reactor and uranium to operate it.

The reactor will be the one which the U.S. plans to set up in Geneva as an exhibit for the atoms for peace conference.

The cost of the reactor to be sold to Switzerland will be $183,000, the announcement said.

Officials had previously announced that the Swiss Government was cooperating with the project of setting up an atomic reactor in  Geneva to demonstrate the powerful use of atomic energy at the conference of United Nations countries scheduled there in the middle of this year.

Washington, June 10 (CNA.UP) The United States Government announced today that it has initiated with Denmark an agreement under which U.S. companies will authorized to help that country obtain an atomic reactor and six kilograms of uranium with which to operate it. 

When Watchman Of A Circus Goes To Sleep On Duty 

Durban, South Africa. June 10 (CNA UP) A circus night watchman went to sleep on the job last night and set off this chain reaction of disaster. 

First, a leopard escaped from its cage. The watchman awakened to find the beast pulling the blanket from him. 

Next, a baby elephant slapped the leopard with its trunk. The leopard reacted by attacking a group of trained Shetland ponies, killing two. 

A pajama-clad ringmaster was wakened by the uproar and chased the escaped leopard with a kitchen chair. Five patrols of [[?]] joined the chase after the ringmaster had driven the leopard through the [[?]] in the direction of the railway station. 

The leopard finally was cornered and shot to death in the railway yards. 

The night watchman left, explaining he was seeking a new job. 

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Sen. Clements, Dirksen Here To See US Aid Programs, Will Tour Island

President Chiang Kai-shek yesterday received two United States Senators, Earle C. Clements and Everett Mckinley Dirksen, who flew in to Taipei earlier the same day from Tokyo and Manila, respectively. 

The two distinguished visitors are here on a [[?]]-day visit during which they will conduct an on-the-spot inspection of the American military and [[?]] aid programs in Free China. 

The visiting American Senators will witness a military maneuver to be staged by Chinese troops at a military base this morning. They will attend a dinner held in their honor by American Ambassador Karl L. Rankin shortly after inspecting the Judd Village, which was constructed under an ARC[[?]] program.

In the afternoon, Clements and Dirksen will participate in two meetings - one at the American Embassy and the other at the Chinese Ministry of National Defense. During the meetings, the visitors will meet with ranking American and Chinese officials to [[?]].

They will then be honored at an unofficial dinner given by President and Madame Chiang this evening. 

The two Senators will leave for southern Taiwan tomorrow morning in the company of General William C. Chase, chief of the Military Assistance Advisory Group. They will inspect the industrial setup installed under the aid program of FOA/MSMC.
[Continued on Page 4]
[[images - photos of Senator Clements, wearing a hat, and Senator Dirksen, bareheaded and holding his hat]]
[[captions]] Clements  Dirksen [[/captions]]

Police Nab Man Seducing 95 Girls In Ad Fraud

Nyosen[[?]], Japan, June 10 (CNA-UP) [[?]], 29, who advertised in magazine for female companionship because he was "lonesome and without a single relative or friend" was arrested by police today for allegedly seducing 95 girls who answered the ad.

10 Under Medical Watch As A-Tracer Goes Astray
Gothenburg, Sweden, June 10 (CNA-UP) Police ordered 10 persons under medical surveillance today after an atomic "tracer" instrument went astray while plumbers were using its deadly rays to check faulty pipes. 

East Germany Plans To Create Armed Forces

Berlin, June 10 (CNA-UP) The East German Communists announced today that they intend to create a national army, and indicated they will introduce conscription for the citizens of East Zone [[?]].

The moves were disclosed in a speech made by East Zone Deputy Premier and Communist Party boss Walter Ulbricht and printed in full in the official Communist Party newspaper Neues Deutschland.

Speaking to the Communist Party central committee, Ulbricht made no mention of voluntary enlistment and for the first time used the expression [[?]] (Military Service Time), the old Nazi term for compulsory service. 

"The protection of peace demands, as laid down in the Warsaw agreements, the creation of armed forces in the German democratic republic in order to remove all hope of military success from the aggressive powers of the Western monopoly capitalists," he said. 

Anti-Prostitution Month Starts in Japan To Build Orderly Society

Tokyo, June 10 (CNA-UP) Japan today started an "anti-prostitution month" to take its half a million prostitutes out of brothels and off the streets into reputable work. 

The campaign, sponsored by the Labor Ministry, was [[?]] on an appeal for "an orderly society."

Emphasis was to be placed on education of the people against the evils of prostitution. Lectures, meetings of influential local citizens, radio programs and posters are being depended on to carry the message of the slogans, "protect the rights of women," "wholesome relations between men and women," and "build an orderly society." 

Police planned no special raids in conjunction with the campaign. A spokesman said, "The police will continue as always to take action against lawbreakers." 

In highlighting the seriousness of the problem, a Labor Ministry spokesman estimated there were "more than 500,000" prostitutes in red light districts and on the street in this country of 38,000,000 in June last year, and said hard times have caused a steady increase in this number. 

Earlier this week, a group of women Diet members of all political tinges joined in presenting to the Parliament a new bill against prostitution. 

Strengthening Taiwan Air Defense

An advance headquarters of the U.S. 13th Air Task Force was set up on Taiwan yesterday hours after the arrival of Brigadier General Benjamin O. Davis, Jr., who is Deputy Commander of the 13th Air Task Force in Taiwan.

General Davis, accompanied by his wife, flew in to Taipei at 1:49 p.m. yesterday from Manila aboard a special USAF plane. 

The advance headquarters was put under the direct command of the United States Air Force Headquarters for the Pacific Area, and it will cooperate closely with the Chinese Air Force for the air defense of the Taiwan area.

Upon his arrival, General Davis told the press he was very happy for being assigned to the present job. He added that he would stay here for a considerable length of time.

The visiting general, however, declined to comment on current reports that American air force in Taiwan would be strengthened shortly.

[[image - black & white photograph of Gen Davis and wife]]

Earlier reports said that the aerial defense of the Taiwan area, originally a responsibility of the Fifth Air Force in Tokyo, would be handed over to the Philippines-based 13th Air Force.

[[image - black & white photograph shows Brig. Gen. Benjamin O. Davis, Jr., and Mrs. Davis at the (?) airfield (UNPA Photos).

Bundesrat Refers Rearmament Law Back To Gov't For Clarification 

Bonn, June 19 (CNA-UP) West Germany's Upper House (Bundesrat) today refused to take a position on the country's first rearmament law and referred it back to the government and Lower House for clarification.

The Bundesrat referred the so-called "volunteer's law" back to the government and to the Lower House (Bundestag) with recommendations that several constitutional questions be clarified.

The Upper Chamber, which is composed of delegates from the nine West German states, refused to take any position on the legislation, declared "it has not been possible to clarify a number of basic questions."

Adenauer Becomes Mr. In Red Press

Berlin, June 10 (CNA-UP) Chancellor Konrad Adenauer, who for years has been known to the Communist press only as "imperialist lackey," "warmonger" or "puppet," abruptly became "Mr. Adenauer" today.

The Soviet organ Tägliche Rundschau, reacting promptly to Russia's attempt to court the German leader, called him "Mr. K. Adenauer, chancellor of the Federal Republic." Other Red papers called him "Mr. Federal Chancellor."

Senate to Set Up Subc'tee On Disarms Proposals

Washington, June 9 (CNA-UP) The Senate Foreign Relations Committee today unanimously approved the 1949 Geneva Conventions for human treatment of war victims.

The group also voted unanimously to recommend that the Senate set up a special 10 member Senate subcommittee to study disarmament proposals. Members would be named by the vice president from members of the foreign relations, armed services and atomic energy committees.

Hope Dimmed For Ending Strikes In UK This Week

London, June 10 (CNA-UP) Peace talks to end the 13-day-old British railroad (NOTE-faded text on next line) gloomy atmosphere and dimmed hopes of a weekend settlement.

The stumbling block was scope of the talks - the question of when preliminary "discussions" on the strikers wage demands would end and hard "negotiations" begin.

The three main barriers to a quick rail settlement were:

(1) The government's reluctance to negotiate while the strike continues.

(2) The threat of a heavy counter claim from the non-striking National Union rail-workmen whose 400,000 members are maintaining emergency train service.

(3) The extent of the total bill for any future settlement.

Meanwhile, an equally paralysing dock strike by 20,000 stevedores went into its 19th day but with signs that a compromise might solve a jurisdictional union battle which caused the walkout.

Lie Urges Revision Of UN Charter

(?), Central Norway, June 10 (CNA-UP) Trygve Lie, first secretary general of the United Nations, said today he will go to San Francisco to tell the organisation that its charter needs revising.

Lie's message to the U.N. in San Francisco on the occasion of its 10th anniversary June 30 is that the atomic age makes a revision of the U.N. Charter mandatory.

He said that "apart from all other regards and considerations which support the idea of taking up for discussion next year...as planned in 1945...the U.N. Charter and the work of the United Nations. I am of the view that the new problems, facing us in the atomic age in which we live, require enlargements, changes, amplifications or new interpretations of the charter."

Lie said that "the world opinion demands that atomic weapons, the atom bomb and the hydrogen bomb, must be laid under international control. The threat against humanity from those all devastating arms must be brought to an end. An international control may be established outside of the United Nations, but in my opinion the U.N. must in any case play a central and ruling role."

Molotov Sails For U.S. With Secret Of Possible Soviet Nod to Parley

Paris, June 30 (CNA-UP) Soviet Foreign Minister V.M. Molotov sailed for the United States today with the secret of Russia's possible acceptance to a July Big Four "summit" conference apparently locked in his briefcase.

Molotov was wreathed in smiles when he boarded the mighty Queen Elizabeth at Cherbourg at 0745 (0645 GMT) but had retired to his suite when the liner sailed to New York in windy, sunny weather at 1030 (0930 GMT)

Informed sources said Molotov indicated to French Premier Edgar Faure at a diplomatic luncheon in Paris yesterday that Russia has no objections to a Big Four talks in Geneva starting July 3. 

But neither he nor the Soviet Government has yet to formally agree to the date and site.

Molotov will represent the Soviet Union at the June 26th ceremonies at San Francisco commemorating the 10th anniversary of the United Nations Charter signing.

French [[??]] sources said that Molotov [[??]] to give the green light to the forthcoming Big Four [[??]] of government chiefs when he meets his Western counterparts at San Francisco

The Soviet foreign minister told Russia [[??]] Premier Faure and Foreign Minister Antoine Pinay at a two-hour luncheon in Paris yesterday that the Kremlin now thinks [[??]] should be bypassed.

Menon Meets Canada Officials, Leaving For U.S.
Ottawa, June 10 (UP) V. K. Krishan Menon, roving Indian ambassador, was to hold further meetings with Canadian officials today during a diplomatic stop-over here en route to the United States.

Although no talks were scheduled for today, officials said it was likely the special troubleshooter for Asian neutralism would hold further meetings with officials in the morning. He conferred twic with External Affairs Minister Lester H. Pearson yesterday and dined with him last night

Menon spent [[??]] with Prime Minister Louis St. Lauens and met briefly with Welfare Minister Paul Martin, leader of the Canadian delegation at the last U.N. General Assembly.

There were no official reports on the discussions. A [[??]] conference with Menon was tentatively scheduled for 11 a.m. (1600 GMT) today, [[type obscured]] plane for Montreal and New York.

Chou Unwilling To Negotiate Truce With US
Jakarta, June 10 (UP) Red China is not willing to negotiate a Taiwan "[[??]]" agreement with the United States, the Indonesian press reported today.

"Since there is no war between (Red) China and the United States the question of a ceasefire does not [[??]]," Red China's Premier Chou En-lai told Indonesian newsmen in an interview on June 2.

" [[??]] can it be used as a prerequisite for the negotiation," Chou said.

Chou made the statement to Indonesian newsmen who accompanied Prime Minister Ali Sastroamidjojo on his recent trip to Peiping. the interview was published today in both Indonesia and Red China.

Peiping's New China News Agency also broadcast the interview.

Bishop Expelled From Red China

Hongkong, June 10 (CNA-UP). The Chinese Communists today expelled American Catholic Bishop Frederick A. Donaghy on charges of subversive activities.

The middle-aged American bishop from Fall River, Massachusetts entered into Honkong at 1:30 p.m., boarded a train for Kowloon and arrived at 4 p.m.

The bishop asked newsmen to wait for a day or two before interviewing him. 

He did say, however, that three days ago the Chinese Reds summoned him and told him he was guilty of subversive activities and was to be expelled.

Bishop Donaghy was first arrested at Wuchow in Kwangri Province on Christmas Day, 1950, and was jailed for six months. When he was released from prison he was restricted to the city limits. He had been in Wuchow ever since. 

Montgomery Resigns For Compelling Reasons

Washington June 10 (CNA-UP) Maj. Gen. John B. Montgomery, commanding general of the Eighth Air Force and generally regarded as a rising young [[??]] in the strategic air command, has resigned, effective next Monday.

Secretary of Air Harold F. Talbott accepted the resignation of the [[??]] Montgomery "with regret."

Montgomery himself said in Fort Worth last night "compelling reasons" having to do with the future security of his family led him to resign his $14,000 a year commission.

US Senate Asked To Pass Austrian State Treaty
Washington June 10 (CNA-UP) Secretary of State John Foster Dulles urged today that the Senate approve of the Austrian state treaty before the Big Four meeting.

He said: 
"It may open the way to further cooperation to fulfill other wartime pledges."

[[??]] spoke before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee.

Dulles recalled the United States has consistently taken the position that agreement to the Austrian treaty, fulfilling the Moscow declaration of 1949 "would [[??]] of a significant deal as distinct from words".

Dulles testified in the committee which opened its hearings today on ratification of the long delayed Austrian state treaty.

The committee must give its consent to ratification and then the full Senate must vote similar approval before President Eisenhower can ratify the treaty.

Malik Handed Points For Discussion On Peace Negotiations In London

London, June 10 (CNA-UP) The drive to "normalization" of Russo-Japanese relations showed signs of slowing down today.

Authoritative sources said it would "take some time" for Moscow to study "points for discussion" suggested by Japan at last Tuesday's session of the Soviet-Japanese peace parleys here.

It was after that two-hour session that the two delegations let it be known that they had deferred their next meeting, scheduled for today, until June 14 in order to [[??]] time "for the study of important problems."

It is now understood that at that session Japanese delegation leader Shunichi Matsumoto presented in writing a full list of what Japan considered should be the points for discussion before agreement to end the state of war and to resume diplomatic relations with Russia.

This [[?? ?? ??]] as an explanation of Matsumoto's claims after Tuesday's conference that the Russians "had done most of the talking."

Th only authoritative hint as to what is included in the Japanese suggested "points for discussion" has been advice to study the speech made by Foreign Minister Mamoru Shigemitsu in the Japanese Diet on May 28.

According to this speech the subjects for discussion suggested by Matsumoto to Malik, and which presumably in Moscow whould be:

(1) The return and repatriation [[type obscured]] war prisoners still in [[type obscured]] hands

(2) The territorial question relating to Habomai and Shikotan, the group of islands adjacent to Hokkaido, which the Japanese claim are being held illegally by Russia.

(3) Japanese claims to the Kuriles and South Sakhalin.

(4) A convention for the northern waters fishing grounds to replace the existing annual agreements.

(5) Unrestricted trade between Russia and Japan.

(6) Russian support for Japan's entry into the United Nations.

Sakhalin Controversy

Tokyo, June 10 (CNA-UP) The Japanese Government today dismissed as a "mere product of the imagination" a local press report that claimed Japan will not demand the return of Southern Sakhalin from Russia.

"This article is a mere product of the imagination and is not in conformity with the facts at all," the Foreign Office said in a release.

It did not definitely say, however, that Japan will demand the restoration of the territory in Japanese administration.

Ike Asks For $1 M. For Geneva Parley Expenses

Washingotn, June 10 (CNA-UP)  President Eisenhower asked Congress today to appropriate 1,000,000 dollars to pay the cost of the proposed Big Four conference and further foreign ministers' meetings.

The Big Four meeting has been proposed for Geneva starting July 13.

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[[/newspaper clipping]]

^[[Davis B012 F005 4 sh1of1]]
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