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00:13:50
00:15:55
00:13:50

Transcription: [00:13:50]
{SPEAKER name="Lisa Chickering "}
Here Roberto's putting his horse through its paces for the coming competition on Sunday.

[00:13:55]
{SPEAKER name="Lisa Chickering "}
There have been charros in Mexico ever since the Spaniards first introduced horses to the country.

[00:14:02]
{SPEAKER name="Lisa Chickering "}
The Spanish equestrian customs were then adapted to their new environment, and fused with the Mexican elements to create a most romantic figure: the Mexican charro.

[00:14:12]
{SPEAKER name="Lisa Chickering "}
They're noble and dashing, like Roberto and Carlos, who are following in the centuries old traditions.

[00:14:17]
{SPEAKER name="Lisa Chickering "}
In all of Mexico there are about 50 charro associations, which are actually clubs made up of these horsemen skilled in riding and roping.--

[00:14:30]
{SPEAKER name="Lisa Chickering "}
Roberto is the president of his club, 1 of 10 in Guadalajara, and once a month during the winter months they meet to compete against each other. Don't you think that it looks - well, it's sort of obvious that he rides a great deal?

[00:14:43]
[[Crowd laughter]] [[Lisa Chickering clears throat]]

[00:14:47]
{SPEAKER name="Lisa Chickering "}
Roberto in his garden with his family and a fellow charro discuss the coming competition. Most charros are businessmen by profession - charros by choice.

[00:14:59]
{SPEAKER name="Lisa Chickering "}
Roberto is a chemical engineer and president of a leading firm. His wife, Alicia, although no longer a charra, rides very well.

[00:15:08]
{SPEAKER name="Lisa Chickering "}
They live with their family in Guadalajara's Garden District: a fashionable residential area of the city.

[00:15:14]
{SPEAKER name="Lisa Chickering "}
Roberto, Carlos, and Lorenza leave their house for the special charro ring, to participate in the afternoon's events.

[00:15:23]
{SPEAKER name="Lisa Chickering "}
On Sundays, at noon, this exhibition, called a charriata, takes place. It's similar to our rodeos, although it must follow certain traditions and is always introduced with stylized formalities.

[00:15:39]
{SPEAKER name="Lisa Chickering "}
After the opening parade, Roberto as president, proudly enters the ring on his prancing horse to formally greet the judges and audience, which in turn signifies the charriata can commence.

[00:15:52]
{SPEAKER name="Lisa Chickering "}
And on this day, Roberto's club is competing against another of Guadalajara's leading clubs.


Transcription Notes:
Beautiful Transcript! Just added Speaker name and fixed typo. Added em dash (--) for pause.

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