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 - 1910 - No. 41 AUTOMOBILE  RACING CARNIVAL 
Pierce Bros. Track, Santa Rosa, Cal. 
[[line]]
FRIDAY, MAY 6 - - SATURDAY, MAY 7
at 2 P. M.  
[[line]]
Admit One  SANTA ROSA AUTOMOBILE ASSOCIATION
J. H. EINHORN, President
By [[signed]] B P Noonan [[/signed]]

[[stub]] -1910-
Automobile Racing Carnival
Admit One to the 
GRAND STAND
No. 41 
[[/stub]]

 - 1910 - No. 42 AUTOMOBILE  RACING CARNIVAL 
Pierce Bros. Track, Santa Rosa, Cal. 
[[line]]
FRIDAY, MAY 6 - - SATURDAY, MAY 7
at 2 P. M.  
[[line]]
Admit One  SANTA ROSA AUTOMOBILE ASSOCIATION
J. H. EINHORN, President
By [[signed]] B P Noonan [[/signed]]

[[stub]] -1910-
Automobile Racing Carnival
Admit One to the 
GRAND STAND
No. 42 [[/stub]] 

 - 1910 - No. 68 AUTOMOBILE  RACING CARNIVAL 
Pierce Bros. Track, Santa Rosa, Cal. 
[[line]]
FRIDAY, MAY 6 - - SATURDAY, MAY 7
at 2 P. M.  
[[line]]
Admit One  SANTA ROSA AUTOMOBILE ASSOCIATION
J. H. EINHORN, President
By [[signed]] B P Noonan [[/signed]]

[[stub]] -1910-
Automobile Racing Carnival
Admit One to the 
GRAND STAND
No. 68 
[[newspaper clipping]]
2   TH[[cutoff]]
[[double lines]]
WISEMAN IS COMPELLED TO DIVIDE THE AVIATION PRIZES
[[line]]

The many friends of Fred J. Wiseman will be interested in the result of prize awards for the recent aviation meet in San Francisco.  One of the San Francisco dailies has this to say on the subject:

"While citizens of Santa Rosa, proud of the air feats of Frederick J. Wiseman, the novice birdman of that city, at Selfridge field, were entertaining him last night with a brass band, a banquet and appreciative speeches, friends in this city were preparing to go to the aid of the young birdman before the aviation committee here and protest that the honors gained in the novice class by Wiseman should not be shared by H. A. Robinson and Lincoln Beachey, the two Curtiss men also entered as novices.  Beachey and Robinson have both made flights in standard Curtiss machines set up by Curtiss mechanicians.  They are both carried in the Curtiss camp.  Wiseman is a Santa Rosa youth who has put his own time and money and ideas into his aircraft.

"Santa Rosa's regard for Wiseman was shown last evening when he returned there for a short visit.  He was accompanied by Ben H. Noonan, who has given Wiseman every possible assistance in his efforts to construct a California aeroplane, and the party was met at the Northwestern Pacific depot by a large delegation of citizens headed by the Santa Rosa brass band.  A parade marched up Fourth street to the courthouse, where congratulatory addresses were made by Major James R. Edwards and other prominent citizens, and a response made by Wiseman.

"The citizens of Santa Rosa, under the leadership of the Santa Rosa Chamber of Commerce, are collecting a purse which will be offered to Wiseman for a flight from Petaluma to Santa Rosa, sixteen miles.  Petaluma citizens are anxious to contribute also, it is said, and the total sum offered my approach $3,000.

"With his latest biplane, a machine built on greatly modified Farman lines, combined with the Sommer, and containing many original ideas, Wiseman came to Selfridge field.  He leads all the novices at Selfridge field, and unless Robinson comes out the final day with his Curtiss craft and exceeds the records of the Santa Rosa boy, Wiseman will carry away the greater part of the novice honors.  But nevertheless he will have to share the prize money with Robinson and Beachey, who in their flights, made with all ease, qualified in all the novice events.

"According to F. E. Scotford, president of the aviation committee, nothing can be done for Wiseman.

[[adververtisement]]
Danderine
GROWS HAIR
and we can
PROVE IT!
[[image of head with hair]]
[[/advertisement]]
[[/newspaper clipping]]

[[newspaper clipping]]
[[cutoff]] E PRESS DEMOCRAT, SANTA ROSA, CALIFORNIA
[[double lines]]

AVIATOR WISEMAN RETURNS TO SANTA ROSA FROM RENO, NEVADA
[[line]]

Aviator Fred J. Wiseman, who had a hairbreadth escape from death at the Reno race track last week when his machine was overset after having been caught in an air eddy at an altitude of forty feet, returned to Santa Rosa on Saturday night, and was given a very warm reception by his many friends.  He was accompanied by Ben Noonan, Don C. Prentiss, Alwin Cooper, Bob Schieffer, who, on account of the great friendship that sprung up between Death Valley "Scotty" and himself in Nevada, is now bearing the handle of "Scotty," and Archie Prentiss.

As has already been stated the accident at Reno partially wrecked the airship and in consequence the aviator and his corps of mechanicians decided to return to California to have the machine repaired.  They brought the wrecked machine by express to Petaluma on Saturday night, and as quickly as possible, with wood turned out at Camm & Hedges' mill there, the repairs will be made and then Wiseman intends to fly again.

The new machine is a "bird to fly," as one enthusiastic spectator put it at the race track on the day of the mishap.  Wiseman says so, too, and no one regrets the accident any more than Mr. Wiseman.  He feels very thankful that he escaped with only a few scratches when his machine dashed to the ground.  In another part of the country, at exactly the same time and in an accident almost similar in its nature to the one that befell his machine, Aviator Johnstone was killed.

The accident happened just at time when Wiseman was making, as the Nevada State Journal says, " in his most successful flight before the Reno public."

The lightness of the atmosphere in Nevada is also against the aviator, and it needed considerable manipulation in the earlier attempts to get things right.  This was overcome and Wiseman had his machine in fine fettle for flight.  The Nevada State Journal has [[t]]his to say of the last flight:

"The elevator dipped, and with the engine humming like a sewing machine the car left the ground as steady as a bird.  It climbed for forty feet, then as the impetus waned, the aviator pointed its nose towards the earth and dived again to recoup his speed.

"Down went the machine, and just as it was about to hit the ground the propeller flopped up and it started aloft on its second slant.  Up, up in the air, it soared, finally topping the height of the grand stand above the ground.

"By this time it had approached perilously near the buildings and the race track, and Wiseman tried a left turn.  Almost simultaneously a gust of wind sprang from over the grand stand and struck him amidships.  The air had previously been perfectly calm, and the transition threw his machine off level.

"It commenced to drop at once, diving straight towards the earth, when Wiseman managed to regain control, and altered his course slightly, bringing it back to an even keel.  It plunged to earth, however, the motor spinningg furiously, and struck squarely in an irrigation ditch, thus preventing the wheels from revolving and preventing a safe lighting.

"There was a crash when the wheels crumpled up underneath and jammed through the bottom planes, and one of the wings bent and snapped as it dashed to the ground.  However, the birdman shut off his engine as he struck, preventing the propeller from tearing the car to pieces.

"The sudden shock threw Wiseman from his precarious perch in the airship straight forward among the wires, and stays of his elevator.  He was caught in these, and waved hopelessly to and fro, for a few seconds as the machine quivered.  Then he extricated himself, and plunged away from the debris.

"A dozen men had started across the track, but Wiseman kept straight ahead from his wrecked machine.  Asked if he was hurt, he replied in the negative with a smile, but explained that he did not want to see his ruined machine."
[[/newspaper clipping]]
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