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to the world their contention.
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WISEMAN AND AIRSHIP GO TO BELLINGHAM
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The Wiseman airship has been shipped to Bellingham, Wash., and this morning Fred J. Wiseman, the well known Sonoma county aviator, accompanied by his staff, composed of Don Prentiss, Alwyn cooper and Bob Schieffer, will leave for that city. Mr. Wiseman is under contract to give a series of flights in Bellingham and other places in the state of Washington. Wiseman's many friends here wish him every success, and will await news from the north with great interest.
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[[boxed]]
AVIATOR WISEMAN IN HIS CURTISS-FARMAN-WRIGHT MACHINE
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[[image - Wiseman flying his plane with people standing below, buildings]]

Spectacular flying, something that North Yakima has never seen, is scheduled for next Saturday and Sunday, when Fred J. Wiseman, the famed birdman, will give an exhibition in the art of flying at the state fair grounds.

Wiseman will ordinarily fly 20 minutes or longer, weather permitting, of course, and will attain an altitude of not less than 100 feet. He will also by as close to the ground as it is possible to do, and, should the weather interfere, all those purchasing tickets will be given rain checks for the following day. The aviation exhibition, which is to take place here, is without doubt one of the most popular arranged programs that any aviator could attempt to carry out. Wiseman will do stunts within the grounds that hardly seem possible for any one to even attempt without wrecking the machine.

Seeing the Machine Work.

The main point in aviation meets is to see the way the machine gets off the ground, and in fact, inspect the machine itself, as well as to see how close it can be to the ground and do just as good work as though higher in the air. Many people imagine that by standing outside of the grounds they can see the flight just as well as if they were within the inclosure. This is not the case, because it gives a very poor idea of the working of the machine. 

Successful Career.

Wiseman has been very successful in all his attempts of aviation and has practically met with very few accidents, none of them serious. some of his attempts have been even more daring than those of other aviators. The fact that he recently made a record breaking flight at Petaluma, Cal., to Santa Rosa, a distance of 14 1/2 miles, in 12 minutes and 32 seconds, goes to show that he must be something of a flyer. In this flight he got away apparently with as much ease as a bird, showing that a man can run an aeroplane just as easily as he can run an automobile, providing that he does not get too reckless.

Mr. Wiseman will fly the first time for first money instead of a guaranteed proposition. In fact, the certainty here is based upon a percentage with a minimum guarantee that the share will not be less than enough to cover actual expenses, showing that Wiseman has confidence in the drawing powers of the aviation meet arranged in this city.

^[[Yakima Republic 5/11]]
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[[image - photograph of Fred Wiseman]]
Fred Wiseman, His Flying Face.

Holder of world's speed record. Appeared before emperor of Japan by royal command. First man to carry government mail over aerial route. Ely's flying partner. Defies the elements. Will brave a forty mile wind if necessary.

^[[Ellensburg Record 5/13]]
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