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VOL. VI. 
^[[Ellensburg Record 5/12]]
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SIGNS CONTRACT FOR A FLIGHT NEXT TUESDAY
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Charles L. Young, Manager of Aviator, Makes Final Arrangements For Aeroplane Exhibition.
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WILL ARRIVE ON MONDAY
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Machinists Require an Extra Day to Assemble and Put Bi-plane in Working Order.
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Charles L. Young, manager for Fred J. Wiseman, the aviator, was in the city for a few hours yesterday, looked over the ball park where aviation meet is to be held next Tuesday afternoon and after making sure that there were no dangerous wires or trees to interfere with the aviator leaving the ground made final arrangements of the flight next week.

The aviator, Fred J. Wiseman, will according to contract, arrive here Monday, one day ahead of time, bringing his Curtiss-Farman-Wright biplane, and a staff of mechanics. The aviator will ordinarily attain an altitude of not less than 100 feet. He will also fly as close to the ground as it is possible to do, and should the weather interfere all those purchasing tickets will be given their money back. The aviation exhibition, which is to take place here, is one of the most popular arranged programs that any aviator could attempt to carry out. He will do stunts within the grounds that hardly seem possible for any one to even attempt without wrecking the machine.

The pain point in aviation meets is to see the way the machine gets off the ground, and in fact, inspect the machine itself, as well as to see how close men can fly to the ground. Many people imagine that by standing outside of the grounds they can see the flight just as well as if they were within the ground. This is not the case, because it give a very poor idea of the working of the machine.

Fred J. Wiseman has been very successful in all his attempts of aviation and has practically met with very few accidents, none of them serious. Some of his attempts have been even more daring that some of the other aviators, and he recently made a record breaking flight at Petaluma, California, to Santa Rosa, a distance of 14½ miles, in 12 minutes and 32 seconds.

Fred J. Wiseman, while the youngest of the aviators, has rapidly forged to the front among the best known flying men in the world.

He enjoys two distinctions in which he learned to fly without instructions, that is, just by flying; and he also was the first man to demonstrate a heavier-than-air machine before the kite-loving people of Japan, giving an exhibition before the emperor and his court by royal command. He made a well paying tour of Japan and he has since flown in most of the important meets that have been held in this country.

Wiseman uses a Curtiss-Farman-Wright biplane of his own construction with a Hall-Scott motor.
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WISEMAN, AIR NAVIGATOR, COMING HERE NEXT WEEK 
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To Appear at Ball Park Friday and Saturday
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The baseball park next Friday and Saturday will be the scene of an exhibition of aviation when Fred. J. Wiseman, the California birdman, will perform difficult hair-raising stunts so close to the grandstand that the spectators may watch every move of the air-craft and study at close range the operation of the thing. Wiseman's stunt is said to be distinctly new. Airmen have all been trying for records in height and speed and while Wiseman has also been after a few of these records, he has been making a specialty lately of flying and maneuvering close to the ground.

He and his manager visited Tacoma yesterday and tried to obtain the Stadium for the air exhibition, but could not do it because of school on Friday. Friday and Saturday have been given to Tacoma so the next best lace, and one that will suit the aviator just as well, was the baseball park. Wiseman looked over the ground. Today he will fly in Olympia, where he has been practicing several days. He is advertised to fly over the state capitol.

Few Tacomans have seen a flying machine in operation since the visit of Charles K. Hamilton a year ago. Hamilton's feats aroused general interest here in the doings of the airman. Wiseman is no novice at air traveling. He has been flying for some time and is familiar with the operation of several makes of machines. He has selected for his low flights a Curtiss-Farman-Wright biplane, which will be shipped to this city, probably the day before the events are advertised. One of Wiseman's most sensational air feats was a record-breaking flight from Petaluma to Santa Rosa, 14½ miles, in 12 minutes 32 seconds.
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Sonoma County
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Little want ads create business]]
VOLUME II    PETALUMA, CALIFORNIA
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Threatened Injunction [[?--?]]

WISEMAN WILL FLY [?]
TOMORROW
[[and a note: too much of this article is cut off at the right margin to transcribe and make sense of if]]
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[[image: photo of Fred Wiseman, smiling]]
[[caption: Fred Wiseman, His Flying Face.]]

Holder of world's speed record. Appeared before emperor of Japan by royal command. First man to carry government mail over aerial route. Ely's flying partner. Defies the elements. Will brave a forty-mile wind if necessary.
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WISEMAN AND HIS AEROPLANE REACH THE CITY
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(Continued from Page One)
Johnson left so small an estate," Wiseman said today. "An aviator spends as much money as he makes in experimenting on new machines and new parts designed to get the most rising and propelling power with the least possible power. The machine I am using now represents an investment of $7,500 and I have two others. Mine is not really a Curtiss machine; it is a Curtiss-Farman-Wright."
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Transcription Notes:
The article under heading THREATENED INJUNCTION is poorly copied at the right margin, hence not transcribed. Any transcription would not make sense of what the article is trying to say.

Please note that the language and terminology used in this collection reflects the context and culture of the time of its creation, and may include culturally sensitive information. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution, but is available in its original form to facilitate research. For questions or comments regarding sensitive content, access, and use related to this collection, please contact transcribe@si.edu.