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6 reasons our new Pinto could be worth more in 20 years than it is right now.

[[image - drawings of six Ford automobiles:
1903 Model A
Original Price: $850
Restored Value: $12,000

1909 Model T
Original Price: $850
Restored Value: $8,000

1929 Station Wagon
Original Price: $650
Restored Value: $3,500

1932 Lincoln V-12
Original Price: $4,300
Restored Value: $12,000

1932 Cabriolet V-8
Original Price: $460
Restored Value: $3,500

1955 Thunderbird
Original Price: $2,944
Restored Value: $4,000]]

Ever so often Ford Motor Company builds a new car, it builds more than a car.

It builds a classic.

A car that actually increases in value as it grows older. A car that reflects the life style of the people it was designed to serve. A car that's timeless in its appeal. A car with a blend of form and function all its own.

For these same reasons, our new little car, the Pinto, could turn out to be a classic.

We listened to what you wanted. And then we delivered.

You wanted a small car. So we made our small car as small as the imports.

You wanted an economy car. So we made sure our small car gets about the same gas mileage as the imports.

Yet you wanted a small car that was designed for Americans. Our small car is both roomy and has an engine powerful enough to meet the demands of the American turnpike. And that engine was owner proven for 50 million miles.

And you wanted a small car that was easy to take care of. So we made our small car simple. Easy to service. In the tradition of the Model T. Which went virtually unchanged for 19 years. 

The Pinto. There's no other small car quite the same. Will it be another classic?

There is that possibility.

[[image - Pinto logo]]
[[image - Ford logo]]
...has a better idea 
(we listen better)
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