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Old Crow's good taste begins with men who love to work with their hands.

[[image - color photograph of a man refinishing a wooden chair]]

A flaw in a barrel can spoil the taste of our country Bourbon. So before we put a drop of Old Crow into a barrel for aging, Assistant Supervisor Arthur Yates runs his hands over the oak wood, feeling for imperfections.

Making Bourbon which tastes good, bottle after bottle, made Old Crow famous. Back in 1835, our people figured out the formula that took Bourbon-making out of the hit-or-miss category. They made that formula by hand. We still use our hands in making Old Crow.

After work, most of our men keep on using their hands. Arthur Yates calls on the same craftsmanship watching over our barrel assembly as he does refinishing this chair. For a set of refinishing plans write: Old Crow, Box 771, Frankfort, Ky. 40601.

[[images - three diagrams on refinishing a chair]]

[[caption]] Soften chair's old finish with remover. Scrape. Use toothbrush to get at crevices. [[/caption]]

[[caption]] Wipe wood with fine steel wool soaked in paint remover to avoid scratching. Sand. [[/caption]]

[[caption]] Stain. The trick is to follow the grain, work fast. For plans, see address at left. [[/caption]]

[[image - color photograph of a bottle of Old Crow and a glass of Old Crow with ice cubes]]

Old Crow
Made by good Kentucky hands

KENTUCKY STRAIGHT BOURBON WHISKEY, 86 PROOF. DISTILLED AND BOTTLED BY THE FAMOUS OLD CROW DISTILLERY CO., FRANKFORT, KY.

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