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FULL SIZE CAR?
MID-SIZE CAR?
SMALL SIZE CAR?

HERE'S TIMELY HELP FROM A COMPANY THAT MAKES ALL THREE.

We listen.
And we know that these days there's a lot of concern about a fuel shortage and an energy crisis. About inflation and rising costs.
If you're in the market for a new car, these things might even influence what size car you buy.
But before you make up your mind, you really ought to think about how you're going to use your new car.
For instance, the family of six trying to get by with a small size car may soon find out that a full size or mid-size car isn't an extravagance - it's a necessity. On the other hand, it might be just right for them as a second car or a personal car.
To help you choose the right car for your needs, Ford Motor Company will send you a free book.
It's the 1974 edition of "Car Buying Made Easier." And it tells you the pros and cons for the different size cars.
Part I is about cars in general - types, styles, engines, options, etc. - advantages and disadvantages. This information can help you regardless of which make of car you buy.
Part II covers 1974 Fords, Mercurys and Lincolns - all the models, features, specifications, even prices.
There's no other book like it. To get your free copy, just fill out the coupon.

[[image - Ford logo]]
...has a better idea 
(we listen better)

[[image - cover of book "Car Buying Made Easier" 1974 Edition]]

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For your free copy of "Car Buying Made Easier," write: 
Ford Motor Company Listens
P.O. Box 1958, The American Road - MP
Dearborn, Michigan 48121

Mr. [ ]  Mrs. [ ]  Ms. [ ]  Dr. [ ]
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NAME      PHONE
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ADDRESS      APT. NO.
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CITY   STATE   ZIP
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Please note that the language and terminology used in this collection reflects the context and culture of the time of its creation, and may include culturally sensitive information. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution, but is available in its original form to facilitate research. For questions or comments regarding sensitive content, access, and use related to this collection, please contact transcribe@si.edu.