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Ethel Waters, Blues to Bliss, Dies at 80
By THEO WILSON
Staff Correspondent of The News

Los Angeles--Ethel Waters, an illegitimate child of the slums who became famous throughout the world as a blues singer, gospel singer and dramatic actress, died yesterday at the home of friends in nearby Chatsworth.  She was 80.

The great entertainer had been ill for more than a year, suffering from a weak heart, diabetes and high blood pressure.

Miss Waters, deeply religious, had spent the last 20 years working for the Billy Graham Crusade, singing at evangelistic meetings in the United States, Europe and Asia.

She was best known, however, as a nightclub singer who went on to star in Broadway musicals, dramas, movies and concerts around the world.  Her best[[...]]
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In 1929 she made her first movie, "The Cotton Club Review."  Other movies in which she appeared were "Pinky" in 1949 and "Cabin in the Sky" in 1952.

In 1934 she was a smash on Broadway in the Irving Berlin revue "As[[...]]ousands Cheer," singing "Heat[[...]]ave" and "Supper Time," and earning[[...]]

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THURSDAY, AUGUST 25, 1977
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[[caption]]Associated Press Dorsie W. Willis[[/caption]]

DORSIE W. WILLIS, 91, VICTIM OF ARMY BIAS

Ex-Soldier Was Last Survivor of Brownsville Incident in 1906

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Area's 1st draftee of WWI is dead
By CHERYL MORRISON

Leo A. Pinckney, the first person in the Metropolitan Area drafted for World War I, has died of cancer at 84.

Pinckney, who lived at 859 E. 223d St., The Bronx, died yesterday at Kingsbridge Home and Hospital for the Aged.

He was working as an elevator operator at the Standish Arms Hotel in Brooklyn on July 20, 1917, when Secretary of War Newton D[[...]]
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Zara Cully Dies: TV Star

Los Angeles (AP) -- Zara Cully Brown, 96, the doting Mother Jefferson of the CBS comedy "The Jeffersons," died yesterday of cancer at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center.  Mrs. Brown was admitted to the hospital last Saturday.  Mrs. Brown, whose stage name was Zara Cully, was one of the oldest performers active in television.  She played George Jefferson's mother[[...]]
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[[...]]S, SUNDAY, JUNE 26, 1977

DR. HUGH H. SMYTHE, WORKED WITH DUBOIS

Collaborated on First Major Study on Status of Blacks in U.S.--Served as an Ambassador
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Mrs. Eva J. Sharp was active community worker

Eva Johnson Sharp, a retired employee of the New York State Compensation Board, died of cardiac arrest in Mount Sinai Hospital at 3:30 a.m., Friday, December 2.  She lived alone at 246 Manhattan Ave. in Manhattan.

The daughter of the late Shirley and Maggie Johnson, Mrs. Sharp was born in Lawrence, Kans., Sept. 22, 1903.  Soon after[[...]]

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The young couple arrived in New York City during the late '20s when Harlem was surging with the creativity of the "the Negro Renaissance."

Until her death, Mrs. Sharp was an active member of the National Urban League Guild, an auxiliary of the National
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