Viewing page 156 of 380

National Medical Association, Inc.
83rd Annual Convention and Scientific Assembly
July 30 - August 3, 1978
Washington Hilton Hotel
Washington, D.C.

83rd ANNUAL CONVENTION AND SCIENTIFIC ASSEMBLY
The National Medical Association's Annual Convention and Scientific Assembly will be held from July 30-August 3, in Washington D.C. at the Washington Hilton Hotel. The Annual Meeting will be hosted by the Medico-Chirurgical Society of the District of Columbia and will include an expanded continuing medical education program, as well as the traditional business and social events.

Hosting the Annual Meeting in the nation's capital will provide a stimulating environment to increase attendees' knowledge and understanding of our national health policy, and learn firsthand what our health policy makers are proposing for the future. Legislators and key government officials are expected to participate and report on issues of major importance to the NMA membership.

1978 Scientific Assembly
The 1978 Scientific Assembly has been expanded significantly in scope to give increased opportunities for participation in a Continuing Medical Education program. The scientific program will feature pre-Convention workshops in basic science, community medicine, dermatology, family practice, internal medicine, neurology-psychiatry, obstetrics-gynecology, ophthalmology, otolaryngology, pediatrics, surgery and urology. The majority of these workshops will be conducted on Saturday, July 29 and Sunday, July 30 and held at either the Washington Hilton Hotel or Howard University Hospital.

In addition to the workshops, educational programs will be sponsored by all scientific sections Monday, July 31 through Thursday, August 3. The 1978 CME Credit Program has been structured to provide greater opportunity for registrants to raise questions and contribute information. Presentations will include individually presented papers and panel discussions.

The scientific program is designed to be of value to physicians, interns, residents and, in specified sections, nurses and other allied health professionals.

The following workshops are scheduled. Do plan to attend.

PRELIMINARY WORKSHOP SCHEDULE
[[3 columns]]
Section | Topic and Description | Date(s)

BASIC SCIENCES | CARDIO-RENAL FUNCTION IN HEALTH & DISEASE  | SATURDAY July 29
This workshop will deal with normal functions of the heart and the kidney, compared to derangement of functions during diseases of the cardiovascular system, particularly, hypertension. Special attention will be give to the improvement of the working knowledge of the participating physician regarding heart action and kidney function in health and disease.

INTERNAL MEDICINE | THYROID DISEASE & DIABETES | SATURDAY July 29
This one day workshop will address thyroid disease in the morning session and features:

I. A review of fundamentals of examination of thyroid
II. A review of pertinent laboratory aids
1. T-4(RIA), T-3(RIA), T-3 Resin Uptak, TSH, TRH
2. Isotopic studies
3. Echographic studies
III. Answers to questions arising in practice
IV. A review of therapy including a film on surgery for thyrotoxicosis

The afternoon session will address diabetes and features presentations on:
I. Advances in Understanding and Clinical Application
II. Transplantation of Islet Cells
III. The Eye in Diabetes, Including Remarks
IV. Renal Transplants in Diabetes

OPHTHALMOLOGY | GLAUCOMA | SAT & SUN JULY 29-30
This workshop will have thirteen (13) distinguished authorities in the field of glaucoma for a one and a half day conference.

OTOLARYNGOLOGY | IMPEDENCE AUDIOMETRY | SATURDAY JULY 29
A morning session will be devoted to didactic and practical instruction in the performance of tympanometry and the derivation of static compliance and acoustic reflex thresholds. An afternoon session will emphasize more advanced aspects in lectures and demonstration.

OBSTETRICS-GYNECOLOGY AND PEDIATRICS | ADOLESCENT PREGNANCY | SATURDAY JULY 29
The objective of this workshop will be to enable the participating physicians to:
1. Identify common perinatal risks in the management of the teenage mother and her infant.
2. Recognize the social, psychologic and economic risks associated with early child-bearing.
3. Evaluate the individual teenager's management problems as they impact on the pregnancy and include:
a. Prenatal health education
b. Nutritional counseling
c. Non-obstetrical medical needs
d. Family attitude and support systems
e. Continuing school attendance
f. Selection of family planning method during prenatal period
4. Return to his/her practice situation, and identify resources in the hospital or community with an interest in adolescent health who can operate as cooperative network in the management of pregnant teenagers.
5. Design a management protocol for the pregnant teenager incorporating the multidisciplinary approach best suited for his/her practice situation.
Please note that the language and terminology used in this collection reflects the context and culture of the time of its creation, and may include culturally sensitive information. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution, but is available in its original form to facilitate research. For questions or comments regarding sensitive content, access, and use related to this collection, please contact transcribe@si.edu.