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President Carter has appointed more Blacks, women, and Hispanics to the federal judiciary and to executive branch positions than any other President. He successfully fought to extend the ratification deadline for ERA. He helped pass a constitutional amendment to give full voting rights to the District of Columbia. He issued the first guidelines prohibiting discrimination against the handicapped.

MAKING AMERICA A WORLD LEADER FOR PEACE AND HUMAN RIGHTS

President Carter negotiated a Mideast Peace Treaty after others had failed for thirty years. He has achieved a SALT II nuclear arms limitation treaty with the Soviet Union and the normalization of relations with the People's Republic of China. He has stood firmly for majority rule in Rhodesia and South Africa. And he has given hope to people throughout the world by supporting every individual's right to basic human freedoms.

CONFRONTING THE CHALLENGE OF ENERGY

President Carter has developed out country's first comprehensive national energy policy. The President has set specific goals for sharply reducing our dependence on foreign oil. This will be accomplished through the following initiatives: an Energy Security Mobilization Board to expedite construction of essential energy projects; the expenditure of 16.5 billion dollars during the next decade for mass transit and improved auto fuel efficiency; the imposition of strict oil import quotas; a 50% reduction by 1990 in oil consumption by the nation's utilities; and incentives for home and commercial conservation. Overall, the measures will save 4.5 million barrels of oil per day by 1990. 

CARTER/MONDALE PRESIDENTIAL COMMITTEE

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[[image - photograph of President Carter]]

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