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[[image - man sitting on hands]]
[[caption]] THIS IS NO PLACE FOR YOUR HANDS WHEN IT'S TIME TO REACH INTO YOUR POCKETS. [[/caption]]

If we are truly a proud people, we should not be content to sit back and let others play a bigger part in educating our children than we do.

The fact that individual non-black contributions to the United Negro College Fund amount to many more times those made by blacks is something we should change. After all, the more black college graduates there are, the more it contributes to our status as a people. That's why the United Negro College Fund is so important. And why supporting it is also the responsibility of very black adult.

When you give to the United Negro College Fund, you help support 41 private, predominantly black, four-year colleges and universities. Colleges that give us thousands of black graduates each year, who go on to become doctors, lawyers, teachers, accountants, engineers, scientists. People who are a credit to our race. And who come back to work in the black community. 

So get off your hands and reach into your pockets. Because black contributions help make black contributions. Send your check to the United Negro College Fund, Box P, 500 East 62nd St., New York, N.Y. 10021. We're not asking for a handout, just a hand.

GIVE TO THE UNITED NEGRO COLLEGE FUND.
A mind is a terrible thing to waste.

PHOTOGRAPHER PACCIONE 
A Public Service of This Magazine & The Advertising Council
[[image - Ad Council logo]]

UNITED NEGRO COLLEGE FUND CAMPAIGN
MAGAZINE AD NO. UNCF-3036-78 — 7" x 10" [110 Screen]
Volunteer Agency: Young & Rubicam International Inc., Volunteer Coordinator: Edward F. Kelly, Manufacturers Hanover Trust Company

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