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Noble Herbert B. Stevenson Youngest Illustrious Potentate

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[[caption]] HERBERT BENJAMIN STEVENSON, Illustrious Potentate, Jerusalem Temple 4, Baltimore, Md., he is one of the youngest Illustrious Potentates ever elected in the Imperial domain. [[/caption]]

BALTIMORE, MARYLAND —
One of the youngest Illustrious Potentates in the Imperial domain today, as of August of 1982, is Noble Herbert Benjamin Stevenson, the IP of Jerusalem Temple 4, Prince Hall Shriners in Baltimore, Md. The record shows that Stevenson is the youngest IP ever to be elected in Jerusalem Temple 4 in the past 89 years.

A PH Master Mason at the age of 21, Stevenson served as Worshipful Master of Landmark Lodge 40, and is presently serving the MWPHGL of Maryland as a grand lodge officer, the Honorable Samuel T. Daniels, MWGM.

He is a member of Macedonia United Methodist Church of Odenton, Md., where he serves as President of the United Methodist Men; member of the board of trestees [[trustees]], as a junior lay leader, and where he aided in the organization of the male ushers and male chorus groups.

Steveneson [[Stevenson]] is the son of the late Rev. Nathaniel G. and Blanche V. Stevenson and is married to Elsie M. Stevenson, a M.S. Degree holder from Morgan State University. They are parents of one son, Warnell G. The Stevensons live at 1936 Bellarbor Circle, Crofton, Md. 21114 and their telephone number is AC 1-301-793-0575 or AC 1-301-721-9386.

Inducted into Negro Baseball Hall of Fame

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[[caption]] Noble William W. "Bill" Cash, Sr. [[/caption]]

CHESTER, PENNA — Noble William W. "Bill" Cash, Sr., the Imperial Deputy of the Oasis of Minaret Temple 174, Prince Hall Shriners in Chester, Penna., was recently inducted into the Negro Baseball Hall of Fame in a most impressive induction ceremony held in Ashland, Ky. At the time Cash played baseball in the Negro National League, the only thing white was the baseball with which they played.

CASH'S baseball career started in 1939 with the Camden, N.J. Giants. He played in several Latin American countries, the Mexico Pacific Coast League, in Canada, managed a baseball team in the Dominican Republic, played with the Chicago White Sox, turned down several lucrative offers from the New York Giants and the Cincinatti [[Cincinnati]], Ohio Reds and then retired after 17 years and playing and traveling all over the world.

Cash was at one time in his career considered to be one of the best baseball catchers in the professional leagues, regardless of race. In the Imperial Council he is still doing an outstanding job. He is known to many nobles and daughters throughout the imperial domain as one of the best of his kind. The Desert Beacon salutes this great baseball catcher. May he live to enjoy many more days of resting on past laurals [[laurels]].

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[[caption]] AUSTIN, TEXAS — Prince Hall Shriners who are members of Cheops Temple 200 in Austin, Texas, recently made several financial grants and money awards to civic, education and health organizations within the area. The donations were awarded to recipients shown in photograph above to assist them to continue the good work and benefits they are currently providing to the needy of the Austin community. In the photo above are the donors and recipients. They are, from left to right, Chief Rabban Albert Walker; Illustrious Potentate Frank West; Mrs. Loretta Hill, representing the Sickle Cell Anemia Foundation; Justice of Peace Richard Scott, representing the East Austin Youth Association; Noble (Dr.) John King, President of Houston Tillotson College of Austin, who accepted the check on behalf of the United Negro College Fund, and Assistant Rabban James Wilson. [[/caption]]

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