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[[image - FRED WEAVER]]

Am News columnist Weaver dies at 69

By J. ZAMGBA BROWNE
Amsterdam News Staff

Last rites for Frederick S. Weaver, author of the controversial Amsterdam News column, "The Lash and the Cross," were held Wednesday at St. Mark's Roman Catholic Church in Harlem.

Weaver, the great-grandson of Frederick Douglass, the 19th century abolitionist leader, died last Saturday at Roosevelt Hospital of complications after a stroke. He was 69-years-old.

A memorial tribute to this outstanding writer, will be held during worship service at noon on Good Friday, April 9, at Brooklyn's Bethany Baptist Church, 450 Sumner Ave., where the Rev. Dr William A. Jones, Jr., is the pastor.

Weaver at times took an unorthodox approach to journalism. In one of his recent columns, he sharply criticized a colleague at the Amsterdam News who made a negative comment about former Yankee ball player, Reggie Jackson.

His journalistic style of not biting his tongue also annoyed some people in the white journalism power structure. For example, the New York Post once wrote an entire editorial attacking Weaver for his bold comments on Manhattan Borough President, Andrew Stein during last year's Democratic Primary election.

Amsterdam News Board Chairman, John L. Edmonds, described Weaver as 
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one who made a tremendous contribution to this paper and to the continuing struggle for Black empowerment in America.

"Weaver stood in the place where his great ancestor, Frederick Douglass, once stood, challenging our people to move onward and upward. His death serves as a reminder to all of us that we still have much to do," Edmonds declared.

He said the staff of the Amsterdam News has renewed its commitment to the struggle to which Weaver dedicated his days. "We will never forget him nor for sake his and our cause," Edmonds said. 

The column that Weaver wrote for the Amsterdam News, "The Lash and the Cross," was the subject of much controversy as he took on anybody that he felt was doing a disservice to the Black community.

The "Lash and the Cross" was originally a newsletter Weaver founded in the early 1960's in the Harlem community. It was a journal that no Harlem leader wanted to cross swords with for Weaver was not only read by people, he was believed as well.

In the finest muckracking tradition, Weaver made allegations against entrenched Harlem political figures of the time. He is credited with helping Percy E. Sutton defeat Lloyd E. Dickens in a contest for the State Assembly, which was Sutton's first election to public office. He at times was at odds with Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. and Raymond Jones, a noted Black politician.

Known throughout the U.S. for his knowledge of the Black community and a consultant on Black economic affairs, Weaver served under both Presidents Roosevelt and Truman as the recorder of Deeds in the District of Columbia, the equivalent of a county clerk's office.


One year after he moved to the Big Apple in 1946, Weaver, a graduate of Howard University Law School, was appointed deputy commissioner of housing and buildings under Mayor Vincent R. Impelliteri.

After serving in this position with distinction for about three years, Weaver resigned to join the public relations firm of Thomas Deegan, Inc. where he served as publicity agent for the 1964-65 World's Fair here.

Weaver later left Deegan's firm to form his own Harlem-based public relations agency. He was a member of the Public Relations Society of America, the American Association of Minority Consultants and the Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, whose newspaper, "The Oracle," he edited for about seven years.

Born in Kansas City, Mo., Weaver is survived by his wife, Carol Maria; four sons, Frederick, Jr. of Columbia, Md.; Lloyd A. and Edward R., all of New York; three daughters, Maria L., Thea M. Smith, Anastasia V. Howard, all of New York; a brother, William Weaver of New York; a sister, Anne L. Teabeau of Washington, D.C.; and five grandchildren.

FINAL RITES FOR FREDERICK S. WEAVER

Frederick S. Weaver, great-grandson of Frederick Douglass, died of complications after a stroke on Saturday, April 3rd. He was 69 years old.

Mr. Weaver , former president of Public Relations Enterprises, Inc., a Harlem-based public relations firm, was widely known throughout the United States for his knowledge of the Black community and as a consultant on Black economic affairs. A product/graduate of Howard University and the Howard University School of Law, Mr. Weaver served under both Presidents Roosevelt and Truman as Recorder of Deeds for the District of Columbia, and on moving to New York City was appointed Commissioner of Housing for the City of New York from 1947-1950. Most recently, he authored the controversial column, The Lash and the Cross for the Amsterdam News and was working on his memoirs. He was a member of the Public Relations Society of America, the American Association of Minority Consultants and the Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, whose newspaper, The Oracle, he edited for seven years.

Mr. Weaver is survived by his wife, Carol Maria; four sons, Frederick S. Weaver Jr. of Columbia, Maryland, Lloyd A. Weaver of New York, Edward R. Weaver of New York and James A. Weaver of New York; three daughters, Thea A. Smith of the Bronx, Anastasia V. Howard of New York and Maria L. Weaver of New York; a brother, William Weaver of New York, a sister Anne L. Teabeau of Washington, D.C., and five grandchildren.

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