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town to a rising, glistening municipality with scores of 13 story buildings surrounding the Washington Monument, White House home of elected Presidents and the U.S. Capitol office of elected Presidents and the U.S. Capitol office of elected representatives of the people, as well as a maze of government office buildings.

If you did not know already, Congressional legislation prohibits any building in Washington being taller (unless it is on a hill) than the monument to General George Washington, "the father of our country," which is roughly 13 stories, unless it has several basements, which many fast thinking quick buck developers are building. In less than 50 years this "D.C." has now become a world class city with wide avenues and classic statues as designers Pierre L'enfant and his back assistant, Benjamin Banneker, evisioned [envisioned] when they laid out the four triangular quadrants and circular avenues of the city. In addition to housing Presidents and African diplomats, Washington has become home to regular citizens like the Harps, Murrays, Carters, Johnsons, Coopers, Bourgeois, etc. It, also,

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MERCER COOK
U.S. Ambassador to the Republic of Niger

MARJORIE McKENZIE LAWSON
Judge of the Juvenile Court of the District of Columbia

MAJOR GENERAL 
BENJAMIN O. DAVID, JR.
U.S.A.F.

A surgeon, Dr. Charles Drew became the first director of the American Red Cross blood back

CARTER WOODSEN
Founder of Negro History Week Celebrations and originator of the Study of Negro Life & Culture in the United States.

RET. COL. PARKER

DR. ALAIN LOCKE
The originator of the Negro Renaissance in Arts & Culture of the twenties. 

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