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116 THE CRISIS

it apart in a ghetto, there to be herded and neglected? Is it to prevent its entrance into the higher branches of government service? Is it to deny it the right of trial, visiting upon its members torture and death?
   
No, this is despotism. It is the despotism that Russia has thrown off. Let the United States Government, then, the champion of democracy, at once enforce the Fifteenth Amendment, that its men of color may stand before the world as citizens. Else this republic will be a laughing stock to its enemies.

MARY WHITE OVINGTON.

WE need not leave our own land in order to do the things that shall prove beyond peradventure that it is true that we mean to be just within and without our national borders. We have been startled by the rumors of Negro disaffection and revolt, rumors cruelly unjust to the Negro race. The Negro race is as loyal to the Republic as the white race. Would not this be the happiest of hours, not merely for a gesture of generosity to the Negro, but for such revision of our attitude toward him as shall make it possible for him to bear his part of the burdens of war with eagerness and even with rejoicing? Time and occasion are alike favoring. Dare we as a nation be greatly just, and in our passion for the nobleness of justice rather than the beauty of generousness, deal wisely and healingly with a great wrong in our American life?"

STEPHEN S. WISE.
(In a recent sermon).

Our Graduates

DURING the current year there have been graduated from the great universities nineteen colored Bachelors of Arts, and five Masters of Arts. From the state universities, which rank for the most part equally as high, there have come thirty-seven Bachelors of Arts, one Master and one Doctor of Philosophy. Other Northern institutions have sent out twenty-one Bachelors of Arts, making seventy-seven Bachelors in all from Northern institutions. There have come from leading colored colleges two hundred twenty-two Bachelors and from other colored colleges one hundred fifty-six, or three hundred seventy-eight in all. This makes a grand total of four hundred fifty-five Bachelors of Arts, as compared with 338 in 1916, 281 in 1915 and 250 in 1914. Omissions would probably bring the actual number of graduates up to at least 475. Th record in detail is as follows:

THE GREAT UNIVERSITIES.

HARVARD sends forth ten colored Bachelors of Arts: E. L. C. Davidson, U. W. Holly, H. W. Porter, H. W. Brown, B. R. Wilson, Jr., W. T. Gibbs, C. E. Arnold, B. W. H. Davis, all four-year men; L. V. Alexis and H. P. Payne, three-year men. In addition to these L. D. Turner and J. S. Forrester, Jr., receive the degree of Master of Arts. Mr. Davidson has been a member of the wrestling team, 125 pound class, for three years in which time only one man defeated him. During the past season he won every bout and the Harvard and New England intercollegiate championship. He is the only son of Shelby Davidson of Washington, D. C. Mr. Alexia was a member of the 1916 track squad.

There is one graduate from Yale, J. F. Williams, who takes his Bachelor of Science from the Sheffield Scientific School. Columbia sends out one Master of Arts, E. E. Tyler. From the University of Chicago come two Masters of Arts, G. R. Wilson and L. L. McGee, and two Bachelors of Philosophy, J. C. Carroll and C. S. Johnson. Mr. Carroll held a scholarship from the white Baptist convention of the State of New Jersey. The University of Pennsylvania graduates two Bachelors of Arts, P. C. Johnson and H. S. Blackiston; the latter won the Schleicher prize in German. From 

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FROM HARVARD AND RADCLIFFE.

L. V. ALEXIS
MISS E. B. DYKES.
C. E. ARNOLD.

B. W. H. DAVIS.
E. L. C. DAVIDSON.
W. T. GIBBS.

H. W. BROWN.
Miss N. F. WRIGHT
H. P. PAYNE.

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