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122   THE CRISIS

of South Carolina will give Orangeburg $50,000 a year for buildings and equipment for the next three years. During the last year it has received three new dormitories valued at $35,000 each. The enrollment is 801, the largest among the colored schools of the state.

PROFESSIONAL GRADUATES.

Howard University sends out 13 graduates in medicine, 36 in dentistry, 14 in pharmacy, 26 in law, and 12 in theology.

Other professional graduates are reported as follows: Meharry had 97 graduates in Medicine, 21 in Dentistry, 24 in Pharmacy and 8 in Nurse-Training. National Training School, theology, 2: Talladega, theology, 1; Virginia Union, theology, 2. Gammon graduated 18 students in theology.

From the Northern institutions there are the following  professional graduates; in medicine: W. R. R. Granger, Jr., Columbia College of Physicians and Surgeons; A. R. Burton, University of Pennsylvania; Frank P. Rayford, University of Michigan; B. L. Duke, State University of Iowa; in dentistry: P. W. Sawyer, Creighton; C. E. Cheeks, Western Reserve; J. N. Burwell, University of Pittsburgh, E. M. Gould, Tufts, E. J. Cobb and W. H. Beshears, State University of Iowa, C. L. Evans, W. M. Howard and B. C. Styles, University of Michigan; in pharmacy: J. F. Berry, Purdue; A. J. Pope, University of Michigan; Miss A. P. Bell, University of Kansas; G. D. Strawn, State University of Iowa; L. Williams and C. Strowtherd, University of Pittsburg; in veterinary medicine: B. L. Colbert and J. H. Stephens, Ohio State; in law: Henry A. Rucker, Jr., Northwestern; I. F. Bradley, University of Kansas, and Norris, Yale; in the ministry: A. T. Peters, Yale.

From Boston University, medicine, 1; Creighton, dentistry 1; University of Pittsburg, dentistry,1; pharmacy, 2; Western Reserve, dentistry, 1; Temple, medicine, 3; dentistry, 1; pharmacy, 3; teachers' college, 3.

Colored students in Medicine at McGill University, Canada, make these records: Drs. O. V. Marsh, R. S. Hall, S. D. Bernard and A. Bissember received the degrees of M. F., C. M., at the graduation exercises of the university. Dr. Marsh received the final prize for highest aggregate honors in the fifth year subjects.

In the fourth year J. R. Warren was fourth in honors in Medicine and ninth in Mental Diseases, while A. M. Francis made high honors in Ophthalmology.

In the third year, J. R. Williams headed the honor list in Medicine, while P. M. H. Savory was fourth in aggregate honors of all subjects of the third year, having made first place in honors in Clinical Surgery; second in Clinical Medicine; third in Bacteriology and other places in honors in Physiology and Pathology.

In the first year E. E. Thompson was eleventh in aggregate honors of all subjects.

Despite this record and similar records in previous years, the colored students have sent out this message:

"The leading University of Canada, McGill, admitted by all her sister Universities and the general public to be the main centre of thought and culture in Canada, has decided to debar coloured students from her medical school on the excuse that their presence is objected to by the Maternity Hospital solely on account of their colour. This is what we are made to feel, what we did not expect from a part of the British Empire that prides itself in British rights and freedom. . .

"The authorities at McGill have acknowledged that the coloured students have always borne a good character both in behaviour and in scholarship in the University, and that the present move is IN NO WAY DUE TO ANY MISCONDUCT ON THE PART OF THE STUDENTS, PAST OR PRESENT."

NORTHERN HIGH SCHOOLS

THIRTEEN colored students graduated from the high schools of New York City. Those distinguished for scholarship are A. F. Redding and I. C. Daly. From Boston, at least four, and probably others; Chicago, 20, including H. R. Lewis, prominent in athletics and one of the "most popular boys in his class," M. Gibbs, also an athlete, and Miss M. A. Smith who stands high in scholarship, especially in French and art; Cleveland, 13; one, Miss V. Washington, "is very bright. She should be helped to go on to college;" Indianapolis, 15; Miss Mildred Best was one of the twenty-nine


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O. BUSTAMENTE,
O. Wesleyan.
T. A. MORTON,
Kansas.
E. R. MOORE,
Iowa State.
A. H. CAMPER,
Hillsdale.

T. DE BOSE,
Oberlin.
A. A. KEENE,
Iowa.
G. L. HOLLEY,
Colby.
W. CAIN,
Iowa State.

C. C. COHEN,
Oberlin.
W. C. HUNNICUTT,
Ohio Univ.
E. F. COX,
Indiana.
R. CAIN,
Kansas.

A. A. DYER,
Bates.
E. COLLINS,
Coe.
J. S. PRICE,
Michigan.
D. M. PRILLERMAN,
Michigan Ag.

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