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AIRPORTS AND AIRWAYS

Long Island News
Casey Jones of the Curtiss Exhibition Co. of Garden City, is fixing up an Oriole in very tricky fashion for the On-to-Dayton Race. By removing the center section and shortening the span of the lower wing, a single bay machine has been produced which looks very speedy.

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R.L. Howard, pilot of the Fokker planes, has fixed himself up a Canuck that looks like a real ship. It is fitted with a Curtiss K6 motor and the span of the lower wing has been considerably reduced. The fuselage has been rebuilt with three-ply which has been given a light yellow natural wood finish. The flying wires are painted blue and liberal use of chased steel gives the machine the appearance of being set up for an exhibition.

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Arthur L. Caperton formerly with the Aero marine Airways and more recently with the Curtiss Co. at Atlantic City, has been testing out a new Oriole and Jenny which he will pilot for the Fairview Airplane Co,.
G.M. Thomas is secretary and treasurer of this company, and W.L. Hacker is the general manager. They will do aerial photography and passenger carrying around the Delaware Water Gap, Penna.

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C.B.D. Collyer of the Skywriters has recovered from his automobile accident and is advertising the "Iron Horse" over New York for the Fox Film Co.
Capt. E.D.C. Hern is writing "Daily Star" over the Canadian Fair at Toronto. The rest of the staff including Major Savage, Captain Lingham and Messrs. Tate-Cox, Bradley and McMullen are working with colored smoke for the Daily Mail over the Wembley Exhibition in England.

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The metal monoplane flying boat which Messrs. Booth and Thurston are building for Harold Vanderbilt is completed and is being moved to Port Washington for assembly.

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Three persons were killed on Aug, 24, when a sightseeing airplane piloted by William Sharp and carrying two passengers spun into the ground out of control near Hicksville, L. I. The dead included Pilot Sharp, Charles Noeding of Weehawken, and his ten-year old son, Herbert.
Sharp was returning from a short sightseeing flight, when his ship suddenly went into a spin and continued spinning down to an altitude of about 200 ft. There the pilot seemed to regain control for a moment, but the ship promptly fell into an opposite spin ans crashed, turning over. As Sharp was a pilot of long experience, ans nothing appears to have been wrong with the ship, it is believed that the pilot, who is said to have been suffering from high blood pressure, lost consciousness in the air and regained it too late to bring the ship out of the spin.

Cleveland News
By Cy Caldwell
H. A. Kinsey and associates are flying for Fairchild Aerial Photos Co. Pilots Harold P. Little and Eddie Critchley have secured views of Toledo's Harbor developments for Toledo Chamber of Commerce, in connection with the St. Lawrence great waterways project. In all, 200 pictures were taken, including the Willy-Overland plant and other factories and developments in and around Toledo. Madison Gold Lakelands, Mentor Beach, and South Bedford are some of the real estate developments photographed. Bedford, 13 mi. from Cleveland, was taken from 10,000 ft. on a clear day, showing Cleveland and Lake Erie as backgrounds-a remarkably fine picture.
Mr. Kinsey and associates are now making a complete mosaic map of Cuyahoga Country and vicinity for the Cleveland Union Terminals Co.

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The Cleveland Wright Aviation Co., C. A. Wright, president, are operating a new commercial flying field at Center Road, near Kinsman Road, at the South Eastern edge of Cleveland.
L. A. Danison, Chief Pilot for the Company, states that over 400 passengers have been carried since the opening of the field four weeks ago.
Operating from the field are Messrs. Schneider and Parker and J. M. Khas who have been very busy passenger-carrying on Saturdays and Sundays. The other days of the week they have been spared the intrusion of passengers, and could therefore devote their entire time to contemplation and prayer.
It is strange to consider the utter solitude that surrounds a pilot five days a week as he stands beside his ship displaying the slogan "Rides, $3.00" Compared to him, the last of the Mohicans was a roystering blade dashing about amid  a multitude. There he stands, he and his Jennit, growing old together; while the motorists on the nearby main road abate the speed of their Fords scarcely 10 rattles  per hour; and the rusty sparrow who perched for a moment on the top plane shows his contempt for all airplanes after his usual fashion, says "Cheep ! Cheep !" and straightway departs. Yet, still the hopeful pilot lingers on in solitude's sweet contemplation waiting in vain for 1 with 3, the magic 3 with symbol fair before it, $. Comes at last the evening, gentle, somnolent, kindly covering with sable folds that lonely watcher of the wayside; hides him from, the curious unprofitable gaze of strangers; in night's oblivion mercifully packs him.
The moral, if any, of this is: "Get a job in a store and stay there."

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Pilot Danison recently took for his first airplane ride a spry old gentleman of 92 years' growth—or say about 72 years' growth and 20 years' shrinkage—old gentlemen do shrink you know. It's just a question of when they stop growing and start shrinking. 
It seems two schools of thought have passed opinions on this flight. The first maintains that the ancient is right up with the times, carrying the lighted torch of progress and all that sort of thing. The second school says it is a clear case of mental decay, and that for a man of 92 to fly at all proves that he has reached the tertiary stages of utter senility. 

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The Kindred Flying Circus plays Cleveland this week. They have no elephants, but I shall carry water for the pilots and get in free. 

Night Aerial Advertising

The Night Aero Advertising Corp. of New York, has secured from the Fox Film Corp., a contract for advertising "The Iron Horse," a new romantic film drama which opened at the Lyric Theatre, New York, Aug. 28. 
An electric sign bearing the legend "The Iron Horse" in letters 10 ft. high, attached to the lower wings of a Standard with Curtiss C6 engine is the new advertising medium. The original contract called for ten night flights extending to Sept. 16, at a price stated to be $1,000 each. Due to the success of the night advertising, the contract has been increased to twenty flights in other large eastern and middle western cities. The flights began on the night of Aug. 16 and the flying exlectric sign has been seen by thousands of people in and around New York on clear nights, resulting in a large amount of newspaper publicity. 
Albert Kline, formerly a lieutenant in the U. S. Air Service, is the pilot of the night advertising plane. 

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