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The Daily News, Thursday, April 10, 1924.

EXHIBIT MINIATURE AIRPLANES HERE.
[[caption]]
LEFT TO RIGHT-MRS. "BERT" METZGER, OFFICE SECRETARY OF THE AERO CLUB OF ILLINOIS; KATHERINE STINSON, WHO CLAIMS THE DISTINCTION OF BEING THE FIRST CHICAGO WOMAN TO LEARN HOW TO FLY, AND CHARLES DICKINSON, PRESIDENT OF THE AERO CLUB. THEY ARE EXAMINING A MODEL PLANE.
[By a staff photographer of The Daily News..]

CHICAGO WOMEN HAS FLOWN TWELVE YEARS
Katherine Stinson Declares Girl Can Learn in 3 Weeks to Operate Plane.
BY TERENCE VINCENT.
[Executives Club Aviation Chairman.]
"There are strata of air. One is about 2,500 feet high, and sometimes we have to go 6,000 feet up to get good air in which to fly - sometimes it is found near the ground," said Katherine Stinson, the first woman to learn to fly in Chicago, when she visited her friends in the Aero Club of Illinois. She learned to fly at the cicero flying field in 1912 after taking two months of instruction from Max Lillie and DeLloyd Thompson. "Yes, I'm in Chicago to look over the latest styles in airplanes. It's been so long since I flew that I want to be more apt in identifying the latest models of aircraft, so I'm brushing up."
Nowadays the airplane-teaching methods are so perfected that a girl of similar ability, with Elmer Partridge, could learn to fly within three weeks, and the weather were good.
Two Brothers and Sister Fly.
Katherine is one of four children who fly. Her sister Majorie learned to fly in 1914 and taught 200 Canadians how to fly in San Antonio, Tex., before the United States entered the war. Eddie learned to fly the same year and has achieved an immortal name for himself as a test pilot, as pilot of the two first civilian nonstop flights from Chicago to New York (once in November, 1921, with five persons aboard and on July 27, 1923, at night with Charles Dickinson, president of the Aero Club of Illinois) and as coholder of a world's duration airplane record of 26 hours and 19 minutes in December, 1921. Jack, the youngest and tallest member of the family (six feet three and a ha
learned to fly from Eddie in
San Antonio, Tex.
"Yes, I learned to fly first
Katherine, "but Eddie flew
Cleaned First Plane She
Mrs. "Bert" Metzger, office
for the Aero Club of Illinois,
erine thoroughly cleaned the
plane she bought.
Mrs. Metzger is the only
woman to learn to fly since M
son soloed in the spring of 191
"That first airplane made he
the cash, and she dug up the
cording to Mrs. Metzger. "The
airplane mechanics laughed
attempt to make the plane
and span from tail to nose 
were a new one. A month la
Lillie crashed and was killed in
airplane, possibly because it 
cleaned up thoroughly.
toured the United States sever
giving flying exhibitions in th
days. She toured the orient aft
ing in Japan in December, 1916
the Japanese aviators presen
with a beautiful cloisonne va
usual, this morning when we m
ing breakfast, Kathering was c
the phone. She never did ha
time to herself if her friends k
was in town." During her visit
Aero clubrooms Miss Stinson ex
a Staaken-Zepplin model on ex
there. 

Could Have Been Much Worse

resident Wilson, wants a seat in the 
enate at Washington, D.C.. according to the announcement that she will run against Senator Gillette of Massachusetts, the present incum
ent.
been used with severe economy, thus 
onverting, as by a miracle, the note of crude and piercing blue that as
aults the eye throughout modern Seville. the pitiless sunshine brings 
ut this blue in all its barbarous intensity; and the Sevillians who can 
tand color as they can stand noise, 
nd no cause for dissatisfaction. The 
merican patio, however, is left in its 
coming our long suit in belies-lettres, makes a brave showing. Pasted in every volume is the neat inscription: 'Presented by the Publishers through the American Library association for exhibit at the Ibero-American exposition at Seville, and for an American library in Spain.'
"The center of the room is completely filled by a very beautiful model of the capitol at Washington. It came broken into fragments that might have defied a picture puzzle adept, and was put together by a young Spanish sculptor without losing a crumb of plaster. He was compelled to make moulds and recast parts that had been ground to noth-



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