Viewing page 6 of 19

I.

POPULATION

Three significant changes have taken place in the population shift of Negroes in the United States:

General Changes

(1) For the past 110 years the per cent of Negroes in the total population has been gradually decreasing. In 1810 they formed 19.0 per cent of the population, and in 1930 they were only 9.7 per cent of the population.

(2) While this decrease in their relative numbers has taken place, their actual numbers increased between 1920 and 1930 by 13.6 per cent, or 1,428,012, the largest gain on record. Compared with the previous decade, when the increase was 6.5 per cent, the 1920-1930 record represents a gain of more than 100 per cent. During this same period the percentage increase for whites declined. The table below indicates white and Negro population changes from 1790 to 1930.

TABLE I.

WHITE AND NEGRO POPULATION of THE UNITED STATES 1790-1930

[[6 Column Table]]
Year | NUMBER White | NUMBER Negro | Per Cent Increase White | Per Cent Increase Negro | Per Cent Negro in Population 
1930 | 108,864,207 | 11,891,143 | 14.8 | 13.6 | 9.7 
1920 | 94,820,915 | 10,463,131 | 16.0 | 6.5 | 9.9 
1910 | 81,731,957 | 9,827,763 | 22.3 | 11.2 | 10.7 
1900 | 66,809,196 | 8,833,994 | 21.2 | 18.0 | 11.6 
1890 | 55,101,258 | 7,488,676 | 27.0 | 13.8 | 11.9 

Nine
Please note that the language and terminology used in this collection reflects the context and culture of the time of its creation, and may include culturally sensitive information. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution, but is available in its original form to facilitate research. For questions or comments regarding sensitive content, access, and use related to this collection, please contact transcribe@si.edu.