Viewing page 7 of 19

[[6 Columned Table]]
| Year | NUMBER White | NUMBER Negro | Per Cent Increase White | Per Cent Increase Negro | Per Cent Negro in Population |
| 1880............ | 43,402,970 | 6,580,792 | 29.2 | 34.9 | 13.1 |
| 1870............ | 33,589,377 | 4,880,009 | 24.8 | 9.9 | 12.7 |
| 1860............ | 26,922,537 | 4,441,830 | 37.7 | 22.1 | 14.1 |
| 1850............ | 19,553,068 | 3,638,808 | 37.7 | 26.6 | 15.7 |
| 1840............ | 14,195,805 | 2,873,648 | 34.7 | 23.4 | 16.8 |
| 1830............ | 10,537,378 | 2,328,642 | 33.9 | 31.4 | 18.1 |
| 1820............ | 7,866,797 | 1,771,656 | 34.2 | 28.6 | 18.4 |
| 1810............ | 5,862,073 | 1,377,808 | 36.1 | 37.5 | 19.0 |
| 1800............ | 4,306,446 | 1,002,037 | 35.8 | 32.3 | 18.9 |
| 1790............ | 3,172,006 | 757,208 | ...... | ...... | 19.3 |

(3) The third significant change was the shift from rural to urban centers. The only important city in the South whose Negro population decreased was Richmond, Virginia. Here there was a loss of 1.8 per cent while whites increased 10.5 per cent. Losses in Negro urban population, few in number, were in cities such as Spokane, Washington; Lowell and New Bedford, Massachusetts; and Providence, Rhode Island, where the Negro population has never been a large one.

In 1890 less than 1,500,000 Negroes lived in cities.

In 1900 there were 2,000,000; 

In 1920 there were 3,500,000; 

In 1930 there were 5,193,913.

The Negro is rapidly getting to be a city dweller. From an urban population of less than 20 per cent in 1890, now more than 43 per cent of the total Negro population of the country lives in cities. While the white population in 1920 had increased by 2,000,000, the Negro rural population lost more than 200,000. Between 1920 and 1930 there was increase of 1,600,000 in the number of Negroes living in cities.

Though there was this great increase in the urban population, the vast majority of Negroes still reside in the South. Thus, in 1930, 9,361,577, or 78 per cent of the total Negro population lived in that section of the country. The number of Negroes living in the South for the past three decades are as follows: 

Ten




1900 … 7,922,969
1910 … 8,749,427
1920 … 8,912,231
1930 … 9,361,577

Twenty-seven per cent of the total Southern population in 1930 was composed of Negroes.

Northward Movement

However, there is a definite movement away from the South to the North. For instance, the relative movement of Negroes to the East North Central, Middle Atlantic and Pacific Coast regions was greatly in excess of the average movement to these sections. Note from the table below that in the Middle Atlantic and East North Central sections the increase for Negroes was in excess of 75 per cent, whereas for whites it was considerably less than 20 per cent.

TABLE II.

PER CENT INCREASE OF POPULATION
BY COLOR AND GEOGRAPHIC AREAS
UNITED STATES
1920-1930

[[4 Column Table]]

[[region]] | Total | Negro | White 

UNITED STATES | 16.1 | 13.6 | 14.8 
New England | 10.3 | 19.0 | 10.2 
Middle Atlantic | 18.0 | 75.4 | 16.3 
East North Central | 17.8 | 80.8 | 15.9 
West North Central | 6.0 | 19.1 | 5.3 
South Atlantic | 12.9 | 2.2 | 17.6 
East South Central | 11.2 | 5.3 | 13.5 
West South Central | 18.9 | 10.6 | 12.1
Mountain | 11.0 | -1.9 | 2.8 
Pacific | 47.2 | 88.6 | 40.1 

Eleven
Please note that the language and terminology used in this collection reflects the context and culture of the time of its creation, and may include culturally sensitive information. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution, but is available in its original form to facilitate research. For questions or comments regarding sensitive content, access, and use related to this collection, please contact transcribe@si.edu.