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The Maiden Form
BRASSIERE

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The Maiden Form

BELT and BRASSIERE 

The perfect combination for youth 
and grace. Belt of brocade or 
satin, gives the figure the straight 
youthful front line smart clothes 
demand, and a brassiere of net, 
tricot, or satin trimmed with both 
footing and rosebuds. Both models 
as dainty as they are practical. 

COPYRIGHT 1927 BY ENID MFG. CO.

The Maiden Form
BRASSIERE 

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The Maiden Form
DANCE SET

Two delightful garments, exquisite
in every detail of material and finish.
Both are made of a beautiful
lustrous quality of crepe de chine
of crepe meteor, with the daintiest
edgings of rosebuds and footing.
They belong in the wardrobe of the 
fastidious dresser.

The Maiden Form
Brassiere

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The Maiden Form

BLOOMER and BRASSIERE

Both garments of soft crepe meteor
that will come up smiling from
many tubbings. The brassiere
daintily net lined. The bloomers 
tailored in front, with elastic at
back. Lacings and tassels to match
the pipings make them snug above
the knee and very smart. 

In white, flesh, peach, coral, orchid
and black. 

The Maiden Form
BRASSIERE

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The Maiden Form

BELT and BRASSIERE

Another comination that women
find irresistible--the MAIDEN FORM
Brassiere and this snuggest of
girdles, which fits trimly over the
hips and has four hose supporters.
The brassiere of net, lace or silk,
lace of rosebud trimmed. The
girdle of satin and elastic.

No. 879.--Combination sanitary belt, 
which saves wearing two belts, and is
dainty and neat fitting. 

Transcription Notes:
Still unsure about the "columns" format, (also things in all capitals- after checking on other pages, changing things to capitals)

Please note that the language and terminology used in this collection reflects the context and culture of the time of its creation, and may include culturally sensitive information. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution, but is available in its original form to facilitate research. For questions or comments regarding sensitive content, access, and use related to this collection, please contact transcribe@si.edu.