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In the Next Issue of Look On Sale April 12

THE DIONNE QUINTUPLETS
How They Grew.. How They Live.. Their Life Story
IN PICTURES
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World Copyright, 1938, NEA Service, Inc. 

LOOK, Inc. 
Officers: 
Gardner Cowles, Jr., President
John Cowles, Vice President
Aleyn Burtis, Assistant General Manager
Editors:
Vernon Pope, Managing Editor
Daniel D. Mich, Assistant Managing Editor
Gideon Seymour, New York Editor
J. C. Herrick, Hollywood Editor
William Nelson, Washington Editor
Associate Editors:
Charles Burns, Dr. Morris Fishbein (Medical Advisor), Carl Gartner, Ray Maxwell, Tom Mahoney, Noble Robinson, Betty Welt, Virlea Woods. 
Art Directors:
Wallace Burmeister, Paul Maxwell, Lewis G. Patterson
Editorial Offices: 
Main Office, 715 Locust Street, Des Moines
New York, 551 Fifth Avenue
Washington D. C., National Press Building
Advertising Offices:
Ned Doyle, Advertising Manager, 551 Fifth Avenue, New York;
Frank Chaffee, Western Advertising Manager, 333 North Michigan Avenue, Chicago;
William Mattimore, Detroit Advertising Manager, General Motors Building, Detroit;
Southern Representatives, Blanchard-Nichols-Osborn, Inc., Atlanta, Ga. 
Circulation Office:
715 Locust Street, Des Moines; Buel Weare, Circulation Manager.

LOOK is published every-other-Tuesday by LOOK, Incorporated, at 715 Locust Street, Des Moines, Iowa. Subscription rates: 1 year (26 issues) in United States and possessions, $2.00; Canada and Pan-American countries, $2.50; Foreign $3.00

[[stamp]] TAMPA FEB 15 2 1 PM 1935 [[/stamp]]

[[stamp]] AIR MAIL [[?]] [[/stamp]]
From LOOK Readers
THE EDITOR
LOOK MAGAZINE
715 LOCUST STREET
DES MOINES, IOWA

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Loyta Loverdou of New York City sent Look this picture of herself with these words: "I am considered the youngest archeologist in the world and I have two important expeditions to my credit. I speak seven languages, am a licensed pilot... I am trying to break the upside down flying record and that is why I was nicknamed 'Dizzy.' I stayed upside down for 18 1/2 minutes." 

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He Found Himself in one of Look's war propaganda pictures. Ralph Eldridge of Clyde, N. Y., was standing beside a pillar in a shattered French church in a picture (inset) which appeared in "War Propaganda Exposed" (Look, Feb. 1)

Bowling Champion... I wish to correct your statement under the picture of Joe Falcaro. Mr. Falcaro is a very likeable fellow, but he is not world's match game bowling champion. That title was relinquished only a few weeks ago by Hank Marino of Milwaukee, who ... held it for three years...
There are so many bowlers in Chicago who are so far superior to Falcaro that it is amusing.. to have him presented to the bowling public as the match game champion - Harold George, Bowling Editor, The Chicago American

The Ghost Racket... Your pictures on "The Ghost Racket" give only one side. It is true that there are fake mediums, but it is also true that there are genuine mediums. Could there be a fake of anything without the genuine? - E. F. Bobbitt, Nashville. 

Hoodwinked... It seems that you people take a delight in printing articles that sneer at spiritualism.
... We do not take the stand that you have been deliberately unfair (in "The Ghost Racket"), but we do say that you have been hoodwinked - R. G. Pressing, Dale News, Lily Dale, N.Y. 

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This Is Rough Work - but, oh, so interesting! The young man flying through the air here is Pancho Villa, Jr., reputedly a nephew of the late Mexican bandit of the same name. Young Pancho fights bulls for the JE Ranch rodeo, armed only with a red cloak and his nerve, and is frequently tossed around in this fashion, according to Herbert S. Maddy of Woodstown, N. J., who sent the above picture to Look. 

Page 62 - Look - April 12, 1938
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