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HILLS BEYOND MONASTIR TAKEN BY ALLIES

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FINAL EDITION
The Evening World. 
FINAL EDITION

"Circulation Books Open to All."

"Circulation Books Open to All."

PRICE ONE CENT. 
Copyright 1916, by The Press Publishing Co. (The New York World). 
NEW YORK, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 1916
14 PAGES
PRICE ONE CENT.

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GIRL'S FLIGHT SMASHES AIR RECORD; CHICAGO TO N.Y. IN 8 HOURS, 55 MINS.

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RAILROAD UNION LEADERS CALL UPON THE PRESIDENT TO DISCUSS THE EIGHT-HOUR LAW

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Lee, Carter and Shepard Take Up Other Transportation Problems. 

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PRESS CONFERENCE

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cturing and Commer- Transportations and Labor izations Represented.

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Washington, Nov. 20. - President -ll confer with the four - Brotherhood leaders, W.F. - G. Lee, E.S. Carter and -ard, at the White House at - afternoon. 

-pected that the eight-hour - and probably plans for -ation of the brotherhoods - American Federation of Labor - be discussed if only briefly. -ck the President will con- Representative Adamson - the present eight-hour law - chairman which began -ation of the railroad situ- -y.  

President's address to Congress - month he will make reccomendations for the remainder of -ative railroad programme - unfinished when Congress - 

Brotherhood leaders oppose - of the President's recommendations which propose investigation - railroad controversies before -r lockout is permitted. The - Federation of Labor has -e on record against the recommendations. 

-int Commitee on Interstate -ce started to-day its investi- conditions relating to inter- foreign commerce and the - for further regulation along - of the Adamson Eight-Hour - to nearly all interstate pub- -es. 

-ented at the hearing are com- organizations of all kinds from - the country, great manufac- - corporations and industries. Railroad managers will be directed - Railway Executives' Advisory - ee, of which Frank Trumbull, -n of the Chesapeake and Ohio, -ad. The railroad brotherhoods -e in attendance their four Stone of the engineers, Carter Firemen, Lee of the trainment, -pard of the conductors. 

-public is the interest most to -idered in this controversy," 
- Adamson, Vice Chairman of -nt Congressional Committee -rent of the eight-hour law, -day. "Both the railroads and brotherhoods seem for the mo- forget that they are our ser- this matter."

-OR NEWLANDS OUTLINES -E OF THE CONFERENCE.

-or Francis G. Newlands of - the Chairman, explained -e inquiry would cover a wide - He said:

-ill relate to every phase of the -rtation question-the rail ear- -e river carriers and the ocean -, and the perfection of a har- system of transportation em- rail, river and ocean carriers -ll meet the demands of inter- well as foreign commerce, and - also be applied to telegraph and -ne lines, express companies -er public utilities.

-ill embrace not only the sub-

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TUGBOAT BLOWS UP IN THE EAST RIVER; FOUR MEN KILLED

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Four Others Injured, One Probably Fatally, by Blast at Williamsburg Pier.

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Two men were killed outright, two are believed to have been drowned and four others were injured, one probably fatally, when the tug Rambler of the Russell Towing Company of Long Island City blew up and sank at her pier in the East River at the foot of Commercial Street, Williamsburg, early to-day.
    The dead are:
    Capt. Eugene Casey of No. 1048 Putnam Avenue, Brooklyn.
    Andrew Pitts, engineer, thirty-four, of No. 1165 Manhattan Street, Williamsburg.
    Frederick Zaane and Frank Esterbrook, deckhands, known to have been on the tug, are missing. Boatmen in the vicinity say that they undoubtedly went down with the tug and were drowned.
    The injured are:
    Jacob Geisler, deckhand, of No. 48 Diamond Street, Williamsburg, sustained a fracture of the skull and internal injuries and was taken to Greenpoint Hospital in a dying condition.
    Capt. William Miller of the stoneboat William H. Brown, which lay alongside the Rambler, was knock-I down by the explosion, cut about the head and body; taken to Greenpoint Hospital.
    Ludwig Osmond, deckhand, of No. 103 Third Street, Brooklyn, on another stoneboat, sustained internal injuries; removed to Eastern District Hospital.
    Thomas Gregory, forty years old, No. 556 Greenwich Street, Manhattan, deckhand on the William Brown, internal injuries; removed to Greenpoint Hospital.
    The Rambler, a sixty-five foot boat, had just tied up to the crowded pier when the explosion occurred. The report was heared all along the waterfront on both sides of the river and soon a great crowd was hurrying to the scene.  Policeman McAneny of the Greenpoint station turned in all calls which brought the ambulances from three hospitals and the reserves from several precincts. Inspector Boettler took charge of the police.
    The surrounding boats were damaged more or less by the explosion, a three-ton section of the wrecked boiler landing on the deck of another vessel and smashing an automobile billed to Vladivostock, Russia. A section of pipe from the Rambler was driven through the pilot house of another boat. A watch that evidently belonged to one of the victims of the accident was found near the scene. The crystal had been shattered and the timepiece showed every evidence of having been on a long flight, but it was still going and right to the minute.
    Capt. Casey, the master of the Rambler, was making his first trip on the tug, having been transferred from the Rover, another of the Russell Company's boats, on Saturday. 
    About a foot of the Rambler's smokestack is now visible above the water.
    An overheated boiler is believed to have caused the explosion. Coroner Wagner has started an investigation. 

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FRENCH CAVALRY CHASES BULGARS OUT OF MONASTIR 

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Paris War Office Gives First Details of Great Victory of Macedonia. 
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WAR ON 30-MILE FRONT. 
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Berlin Announces That Reinforcements Have Been Sent to Check Gen. Serrail. 
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PARIS, Nov. 20. - Allied troops have been completely victorious on the Macedonian front from the River Cerna to Lake Presba, according to announcement made by the French War Office this afternoon. 
   (From Ivon in the bend of the Cerna River, east of Monastir, to Lake Presba to the southeast of the city is a distance of more than thirty miles, so that the capture of the Monastir represents a victory along a thirty-mile front.)
Following is the text of the War Office statement regarding the victory on the Macedonian front:
   "The fighting which has been going on since Nov. 10 along the front of the army in the Orient, from the River Cerna to Lake Presba, has come to an end with a complete victory for the allied troops.
   "The day of Nov. 19 saw the final result of the vast enveloping manoeuvre of the German and Bulgarian forces which were defending the region of Monastir.
   "On the evening of Nov. 18 Serbian forces, continuing their victorious offensive, occupied the village of Grunishte, east of the Cerna. The same night Yarashok, in the bend of the river, fell into the hands of Franco-Serbian troops. Following up their success with energy during the night of the 18th-19th, our allies, after a brilliant engagement, took possession of Hill No. 1378 and at daybreak of Nov. 19 they drove the enemy out of Makovo.
   "During the day of the 19th several lines of Bulgarian trenches located in the vicinity of Dombromir were occupied by Serbian forces. This determined advance movement compelled the Germano-Bulgarians to evacuate the last of their positions protecting Monastir.
   "French cavalry pursuing closely the rear guard of the enemy entered Monastir Nov. 19 at half past 8 o'clock in the morning. They were followed by a column of Franco-Russian infantry.
   "During the day our troops, working out directly north of Monastir, took possession of Hill No. 821 and of the village of Kirklina (two miles north of Monastir), and they reached the outskirts of Karaman and Crizar (respectively four miles to the northeast and two miles to the north of Monastir). These towns were at once attacked, and the pursuit of the enemy is continuing without respite. Six hundred and twenty-two prisoners and a considerable quantity of war material remained in our hands."
BERLIN, Nov. 20 (by wireless to Sayville). - New German forces have reached the Macedonian front, it is officially announced. The new positions north of Monastir were taken up without pressure from the allies. Serbian advances in the Meglenica region were repulsed.
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THE WORLD TRAVEL BUREAU
Arcade Pulitzer (world) Building. 58-63 Park Row, N.Y. City.
Tickets, reservations, sailings, &c., via all Bermuda. Coastwise, Central and South American steamship lines Baggage and parcel check room open day and night. Travelers' checks and money orders for sale. Telephone Beekmau 4000.–Advt.,

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Miss Law as She Looked on Her Arrival At Governor’s Island After Trip From Chicago
(Specially Photographed by an Evening World Staff Photographer.)

[[image]]

20 BOMBS FOUND IN SUGAR ABOARD NEW YORK SHIP
Second Officer of the Sarnia Tells of Plot to Destroy —Was Afire at Sea

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Henry T. Wybrants, second officer of the steamship Sarnia, recently sold to the Hudson Bay Transportation Company of London by the Atlantic Fruit Company, an American concern, returned to New York to-day on the American liner New York with a story of an elaborate plot to destroy the Sanria at sea on her last trip across from New York.
“The Sanria sailed in the middle of October, towing the 
barge Avonmouth. We crossed in eighteen days, leaving the barge at Dartmouth, England, and going on to Havre and Cherbourg.
“Five days after we arrived at Cherbourg the Sarnia was found to be on fire below. Twenty French vessels pumped water into her in vain for half a day, and she was then beached and flooded.
“On the first day when the wet sugar of her cargo was unloaded seventeen bombs were found in the sugar bags. The next day three were found. All of them were about eight inches square. The officers thought the fire was due to one such bomb and the ship was only saved from destruction because the single ignited bomb failed to set the others off.”

Wybrants said the ship was sold at Cherbourg and the officers were furnished but 10 pounds 5 shillings for their transportation back to New York. Thus, though entitled as an officer, to transportation in the second cabin at least, Wybrants traveled steerage.
“We might have come first class if we had heeded the urging of the United States Consul at Cherbourg and the new owners of the Sanria,” Wybrants said. “They offered us passages in the first cabin at half rates on the Pannonis which is a British ship carrying defensive guns. But we did not care to accommodate the British idea of getting Americans to travel on defensively armed British ships as live American insurance policies.”

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7TH REGIMENT STARTS FOR HOME ON WEDNESDAY

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The Boys Will Reach Here From the Border in Time for Their Thanksgiving Dinners.
SAN ANTONIO, Tex., Nov. 20.—Dates for the departure of National Guards regiments ordered home from the border were announced t headquarters to-day as follows:
Seventh New York, Nov. 22.
Third Wisconsin, Now. 23.
First South Carolina, Nov. 25.
The Seventh should reach New York City on or before the 26th.

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First Member of Congress on Air Trip to Washington.
PHIDADELPHIA, Nov, 20.–Sergt. William C. Ocker, United States Army aviator, left here shortly before 2 o’clock this afternoon for Washington with Congressman-elect O. D. Bleakley of Franklin, Pa., as his passenger— the first Member of Congress to travel to the Capital by air.

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Morgan Only Absentee From Federal Reserve Board Conference.
WASHINGTON, Nov. 20.—The advisory council of the Federal Reserve Board held its quarterly conference here to-day. It is empowered by law to make recommendations on discount rates, reserve conditions, purchase and sale of gold or securities and other banking operations. J. P. Morgan of New York, was the only member absent.

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MISS RUTH LAW’S OWN STORY OF HER FLIGHT FROM CHICAGO

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“It Was Fine All the Way,” Se Declares—“I’ll Make the Trip Without Stopping Next Time if I Get What I Want.”

“It was an easy flight,” said Miss Law of her Chicago-New York trip after arriving here to-day. “There was plenty of cold and fog, but that is what is to be expected in any flight. I didn’t experience any discomforts on the trip and had no mechanical trouble whatever.
“Would I make the trip again? If I can get what I want—a twin motor—I’ll do it right away. Mr. Curtiss was afraid to let me have one. He thought that it would be too much for a woman to handle, I guess, and when he left Chicago I had to do the best I could. So I got the little Curtiss biplane and came along.
“I didn’t have to make any changes, only put in a new gasoline tank, a wind protector and a few other things. I had the gas tank built up to a capacity of fifty-six gallons and I figured that forty gallons would carry me to Hornell.
“But, when I got near there, my gas was giving out and I went in without gas, as I did this morning at Governor’s Island. It was a little risky and I skimmed the tree tops, but I wasn’t afraid, although I had a very small are in which to light.
“I just kept tipping the machine so that the gas would feed a little into the carbureter. I found that the gas would feed only three-quarters of its capacity. When the gas was down to the quarter mark the feeding stopped.
“This morning my gas began to cut out when I reached over Manhattan, and I had to make Governor’s Island a glide as you may have noticed. I couldn’t tip as I did yesterday, and when I landed I was completely out of gas.”

SHE HAS DIFFICULTY MISSING A BRASS BAND.
Mis Law lit like a bird. The band was out of guard mount and the biplane landed within 100 feet of it. Miss Law was asked if she were surprised at being greeted by a band.
“The only thing I thought about the band,” she said, with a merry laugh, “was that I would hit it. I did come pretty close to it, didn’t I? I saw it as I was gliding, when I was nearly over the island. I had the wind three-quarters against me all the way this morning.
“When I rose into the air at Binghamton there was a thick haze covering the ground and the hills and I knew I mustn’t chance going up too high. I went up 2,000 feet and that was my highest altitude for the flight.
“I think my average was about 1,000 feet this morning. Often I was lower than that. The first town I made was Port Jervis, and I don’t remember any of the towns after that. From Binghamton I flew about 200 miles, making a little less than 100 miles an hour. After making Fort Le I took to the water and came

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(Continued on Second Page.)

RACING
RESULTS ON PAGE 2
ENTRIES ON PAGE 8.

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RUTH LAW ARRIVES HERE IN DARING VOYAGE MADE MOSTLY AT 103-MILE CLIP

Wins American Championship for Non-Stop Cross Country Flight by Beating Carlstrom—Finishes Trip in Early Morning Dash.

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SHE LANDS AMID PLAUDITS ON GOVERNOR’S ISLAND.

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Circling out of the haze back of the Statue of Liberty, Miss Ruth Law, a wistful-eyes slip of a young woman, driving a small biplane of obsolete type, soared down to Governor’s Island to-day, alighting at 9.47.31 o’clock winner of the American non-stop, cross-country record in her flight to New York from Chicago, which place she left yesterday morning at 8.25 o’clock, Eastern time.

She eclipsed by her trip from Chicago to Hornell, 590 miles, yesterday, the feat of Victor Carlstrom Nov. 1 in going from Chicago to Erie, Pa., without alighting. When she ended her flight from Binghamton, N. Y., this morning, 217 miles, she had made the whole distance from Chicago, 897 miles, in 8 hours 55 minutes and 30 seconds. Most of her trip she made at the rate of 103 miles an hour. Her little machine was brought to rest alongside the machine of Carlstrom. It looked dwarfed and tiny when its 28 feet of wind spread, 110-horse power motor and makeshift 56-gallon gas tank was put in direct contrast with the twin tractor, 100-foot broad machine Carlstrom had used, with his 208-horse power motor and 100-gallon tank and drivers seat carefully protected from the wind and heated from the engine.
The machine used by Miss Law is the propeller-pushed pattern, with the aviators seat out in the front of the mechanism, exposed to the cutting blasts of the icy air.
As the machine swooped over the seawall of Governor’s Island, making two long hopping leaps at it touched the ground, it narrowly escaped sweeping away the band which was sounding “guard mount.”
The young woman looked less than her twenty-eight years as she pulled off her wool and chamois-skin helmet and showed cheeks and nose reddened by reaction from the chill of the upper air and a tired smile of triumph. There were icicles on her hair.
She unbuckled the broad strap which held her in her seat and reached impulsively for the hand of Major Carl F. Hartman, Chief Signal Officer of the Department of the East, who was in charge of aviation, waiting to receive her.
The major suggested she must be too weary to wait to be photographed, but Miss Law glanced at the disappointed faces of the camera men, laughed and said: “Oh no, I don’t mind.”
She climbed briskly back into the machine, posed and jumped out again to be confronted by Major Gen. Leonard Wood, who had hurried over from his quarters. She shook hands with him with girlish enthusiasm and then Major Hartmann took her in an automobile to his quarters to be congratulated by Mrs. Hartmann and, as Miss Law said with a grin, to give her a chance to “get the red nose powdered.”

“ISN’T ANYTHING TO MAKE A FUSS ABOUT,” SHE SAYS.
“This isn’t anything to make a fuss about,” she said. “I had a lot of good luck.”
Miss Law was in a hurry because she wanted to catch the first boat to take her to her mother, who was waiting for her in Brooklyn.
A delegation of the Aero Club, including A. F. Post, Henry Woodhouse and Evert J. Wandell was at the army post to congratulates Miss Law and give her records official standing. The start at Chicago was under observation of Vice President Stevens of the Illinois Aero Club.
“This seems to me the most remarkable achievement to aviation the world has known,” said Gen. Wood, “taking into consideration it was made by a small woman of small stature and slight physique, who sat out





Transcription Notes:
several of the words on the left column are cut out 3/27/21- Gotten into habit just to leave words cut off as they are as not to assume.

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