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00:06:20
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Transcription: [00:06:20]
{SPEAKER name="Speaker 1"}
And at the end the Negro masses are simply left outside waving a banner and shouting “Freedom Now”.

[00:06:27]
{SPEAKER name="Speaker 1"}
Now an important thing about this is that he says we get into this bind because of the Negro leadership. That it’s because the Negro leadership is either doesn’t see that it has to say that they are going to cooperate with White people, and doesn’t see that they are forced to leave off the image that they are simply Uncle Toms and faced squarely with their constituency and say,

[00:06:57]
{SPEAKER name="Speaker 1"}
“Look, this is what we have to do. We can’t fight an armed insurrection, we have to cooperate with White people, we have to give in sometimes”, says that this bind is caused because the Negro leadership failed to recognize this. But exactly the reverse is true. The bind is caused because the White people heretofore have only been able to give in to compromise to reach some kind of sensible solutions when they are forced by Negro demands.

[00:07:33]
{SPEAKER name="Speaker 1"}
This is what Lester Dunbar has called, and I said it a lot of times to you- the “annealing of the South”. Says to anneal is to heat an object to white hot heat, and then to mold it while it’s cooling off.

[00:07:49]
{SPEAKER name="Speaker 1"}
And the problem is that the South and the country doesn’t change unless it’s heated up to a white hot heat first, and then while it’s cooling off, in the process of cooling off it’s possible to make some changes.

[00:08:04]
(Applause)

[00:08:19]
{SPEAKER name="Speaker 1"}
But this is exactly the bind that we are in all over the country. And the bind is not created by the Negro leadership, it’s created by the fact that the White people in the country by and large have not as yet made up their minds whether they’re willing to grant freedom—- [00:08:39]

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