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00:15:38
00:17:39
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Transcription: [00:15:38]
It says a more serious penetration by unidentified elements is believed to have been made in SNCC, the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee.

[00:15:47]
On 2 occasions, once in Jackson Mississippi once in Birmingham, agents of this group tried to convert a peaceful march into a violent putsch on government offices. Both times they were headed off by responsible Negro leadership acting in time.

[00:16:03]
One of the most chilling documents this writer has seen recently was a draft quote battle plan unquote discussed by SNCC and rejected by Negro leaders for this ...for use this Fall in Alabama.

[00:16:15]
It advocated a march on Montgomery and quote nonviolent battle groups with their own insignia and flags. These quote ... Excuse me. ... these quote battle groups trained in street battle tactics were to cut Montgomery off from all communication with the outside world presumably to provoke nonviolent combat between Alabama and the United States.

[00:16:47]
OK. Now, he goes on that's all right. What he does afterwards is very interesting, because what he does afterwards is cite a riot which happened in North Philadelphia and says that the whole riot was triggered off after a Negro was killed in self defense by a white man by one car which rode around through the streets with loud speakers on its top.

[00:17:11]
And this one car probably was manned by unidentified irritants, irresponsible communist aliens. Now, the implication is, and what he goes on to say next, is that the whole nation could be also set off. And that the nation could be brought to a crisis, by some kind of counter position of the Federal Government-

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