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00:05:12
00:09:36
00:05:12

Transcription: [00:05:12]

Speaker 2: Rhymes with bourbon, just like, I need a pick. How about y'all, feel like singing? Why don't y'all stand and sing "We Shall Overcome". Alright excuse me, we'll save if for the end. How about I sing a song for all the of ya [[cross talk]] okay, "Ballad of Sittings". This song was written way back when sittings first began, back shortly after Nashville. Think it took about a year for 5,000 students to go to jail. I read that in 3 months after Birmingham over 12,000 people went to jail just. You know your mathematics that means the movement's at least 12 times as fast now.
[[singing]]
I was 1960 the place the U.S.A, that February 1st became a history making day. Greens for all cross the land news spread far and wide. Gladly and bravely, youth took a giant stride. From Mobile Alabama to Nashville Tennessee, from Denver Colorado to Washington D.C, there rose a cry for freedom for human liberty. Come along my brother and take a seat with me. He'd call Americans along, side by equal side, brother's sit in dignity, sisters sit in pride. This is a land we cherish, a land of liberty, how can Americans deny how many quality. Our Constitution says you can, and Christians you should know. Jesus died unmourned for all mankind to know -how 'bout y'all help me out?- He'd call Americans on, side by equal side, brothers sit in dignity, sisters sit in pride. Time has come to prove our faith in all mans dignity, we've served a cause of justice of all humanity. There's soldiers in the army with Martin Luther King. Peace and love are weapons not violence or greed. He'd call Americans on, side by equal side, brothers sit in dignity, sisters sit in pride. Oh mobs of violence and hate shall turn me from our goal the Jim Crow law in our poly-state shall stop my free bound soul 5,000 students bound in jail still lift their heads and sing, they'll travel on to freedom like song birds on wing. He'd call Americans on, side by equal side, brothers sit in dignity, sisters sit in pride.

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