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means of transportation or substitute use of communication." Veerling, at 28-29.
86. Jordan, Airport Location in Relation To Urban Transit, 88 Journal of the Aero-Space Transport Division, Proceedings of the American Society of Civil Engineers, 99 (1962); Hammel, Airport Location In Relation To Urban Transport, 89 Journal of the Aero-Space Transport Division, Proceedings of the American Society of Civil Engineers, 95, 96 (1963); Cf. Southern California, at 146.
87. Boston is the only major United States city which is connected by rail with its airport. Roggeveen and Hammel, Ground Transport Of People To and From The Civil Airport, 85 Journal of the Air Transport Division, Proceedings of the American Society of Civil Engineers, 37, 44, 48 (1959).
88. Roggeveen and Hammel, supra, note 87, at 42; Veerling, at 28
89. Roggeveen and Hammel, supra, not 87, at 52.
90. Peterson, at 56-57; Cf. Veerling, at 30, 33 (1-1/2 hours travel time completely unrealistic).
91. A recent study has concluded:
"The facts support a conclusion that changed in airport location cause sharp reduction in passenger generation. For example, a ten mile change appears to result in approximately a 40% change as a general average."
Brown, Airport Accessibility Affects Passenger Development, 91 journal of the Aero-Space Transport Division, Proceedings of the American Society of Civil Engineers, 47, 58 (1965). 

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