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58  THE CRISIS ADVERTISER

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OF INTEREST TO VOCAL STUDENTS
TONE-PLACING AND VOICE-DEVELOPMENT
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Points explained, viz.: Breath in Singing, Trying the Voice, the Soprano, the Mezzo-Soprano, the Contralto, Tenor Leggiero or High Tenor, the Baritone, the Bass, Parts of the Vocal Apparatus, the Mouth, the Tongue, Position When Practicing, Position When Singing, How to Practice, Good Rules for Singing.
Comment from the world-renowned conductor of the Paulist Choir of Chicago, Ill., whose choir has just received the first prize awarded at the Singing Contest held in Paris on May 25, 1912:
"Dear Mr. Tinsley:
"I take great pleasure in commending your very useful and succinctly written book on 'Tone-Placing and Voice-Development.' Your own appreciation of the psychology of singing and the fundamental principles of the art you have cleverly reduced to a simple system. Cordially yours,
"Father WILLIAM J. FINN, C. S. P.; 
Director Paulist Choristers of Chicago."
For "Musical Courier," N. Y.: "A very practical little book is 'Tone-Placing and Voice-Development,' by Pedro T. Tinsley. It contains some very excellent material and vocal exercises, and should be in the hands of all vocal students." 
From "Music News," Chicago, Ill.: "Accordingly this 'Practical Method of Singing' is a most concise and practical little manual, containing many valuable vocal exercises. It cannot fail to be helpful to all ambitious vocal students."
HELPED HIM GREATLY
"Since I practised your exercises of 'Tone-Placing and Voice-Development' my voice is more resonant than it has been for years. It seems to me that I am getting a new voice." Prof. John T. Layton, Director Coleridge-Taylor Musical Society, 1722 10th St., N. W., Washington, D. C.
PRICE $1.00
Address the publisher: PEDRO T. TINSLEY
6448 Drexel Avenue  CHICAGO, ILL.
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ARCHITECTS
_____________

TANDY & FOSTER
Architects
1931 Broadway New York
Telephone 5368 Columbus
_____________________

H. HENRY HARRIS
Architect
Cor. 8th and Princess Streets
Wilmington, N. C.
_____________________

WILLIAM L. BELL
Architect
138 1/2 Auburn Avenue --- Atlanta, Ga.
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CONCERT SOLOIST
LULA ROBINSON-JONES
Soprano
For terms write 32 West 131st Street,
New York City
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MME. FANNIE BELLE DE KNIGHT
Dramatic and Dialect Reader. Engagements solicited. Students given special training in the Delsarte Method. Instruction also given in Dialect, English Grammar and Rhetoric.
Terms Reasonable.
Telephone Morningside 9045
Studio: 231 W. 134th St. New York City
___________________________
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WHAT THE WORLD IS SAYING ABOUT
"A Little Dreaming"
By FENTON
JOHNSON
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Who is acclaimed by prominent critics, leading authors and the international press as the foremost romantic poet and one of the greatest writers of African strain.
"Praiseworthy in the ways of imagination, mysticism and romance." - Chicago "Daily News."
Josephine Turck Baker, editor of the "Correct English," says: "When the young poet brought his verses to me I felt that a new singer had come among us, singing of love, of passion, of joe and sorrow, sounding the depths and climbing the heights. In the brighter passages there exists the deft touch of the born artist, while in the deeper moments he makes sentient the emotions of the soul-a soul that has lived and suffered."
Published by Peterson Company, Chicago. Vellum de luxe edition, 75 cents, net, illustrated.
Agents wanted in colleges, towns and cities. 
Address:
CENTRAL DISTRIBUTION STATION
3522 State Street  Suite 5  Chicago, Ill.
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LEARN TO READ MUSIC AT SIGHT FOR $1.00
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Anyone in the "Brass Band" or "Stringed Orchestra" may learn in a few hours to master the instrument he loves with our "Sight Reader" and "Sight Reader Positions." $1 (cash). Address
WILLIAM D. SMITH
1636 Clarion Street ----- Philadelphia, Pa.
___________________________________

Statement of the Ownership, Management, etc., of THE CRISIS, published monthly at 26 Vesey Street, New York, required by the act of August 24, 1912.
Editor: W. E. Burghardt Du Bois, 26 Vesey Street, New York City.
Business Manager: Augustus Granville Dill, 26 Vesey Street, New York City.
Publisher: The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, 26 Vesey Street, New York City. 
Owners: The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, a corporation with no stock.
Known bondholders, mortgagees and other security of bonds, holding 1 per cent. or more of total amount of bonds, mortgages or other securities, none.
A. G. DILL,
Business Manager.
Sworn to and subscribed before me this first day of October, 1913.
C. H. ARRINGTON,
Notary Public,
County of Queens.
[Seal]

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Mention THE CRISIS

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THE CRISIS

Vol. 7 - No. 2   DECEMBER, 1913   Whole No. 38

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SOCIAL UPLIFT.

MISS MARY VIDA CLARK, assistant secretary of the children's department of the State Charities Aid Association, 289 Fourth Avenue, Room 82, New York, wants to send a charming little colored girl of 3, pictured here, to Darlington, S. C., to a clergyman and his wife, who have agreed to adopt her. These good people became interested in the little girl through Miss Clark's story which appeared in THE CRISIS for January, 1913. Will any readers of THE CRISIS who expect to be traveling South soon, and who would be willing to take the little girl to her new home, kindly communicate with Miss Clark? It would be necessary to take the child to the nearest large city where she could be met.
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Carroll Trotty, a colored hotel waiter, rescued a white boy from drowning in the Thunderbolt River in Savannah recently.

The colored people had three floats in the Columbus Day parade in Boston, representing the Crispus Attucks incident, the attack on Fort Wagner and the part played by colored women in the Civil War. One of the prizes awarded for the best portrayal of an historical feature was won by the Crispus Attucks float.

Judge Kananagh, of the Illinois Supreme Court, made a strong plea for justice toward the Negro in a speech delivered before the Irish Fellowship Club in Chicago. He advocated the appointment of a national commission to inquire into the existing discriminations against the Negro.

Colored girls employed as waitresses in Gimbel's department store, in New York City, who were discharged some time ago, have been reinstated.

Among the three heroes of the "Volturno" disaster who stand out above the rest was S. J. Rudder, a colored fireman who stuck to his post, reviving the confidence of the other firemen, and finally jumped into the sea, late in the night.

Recently hotels at St. Louis, Baltimore, Albany, N. Y., Lake George and other places have dismissed white waiters for colored ones.

Tamina, Tex., with a population of white and colored, has a colored postmistress. 
Please note that the language and terminology used in this collection reflects the context and culture of the time of its creation, and may include culturally sensitive information. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution, but is available in its original form to facilitate research. For questions or comments regarding sensitive content, access, and use related to this collection, please contact transcribe@si.edu.