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214 THE CRISIS ADVERTISER

"FIFTY YEARS OF MEMORABLE HISTORY"
TALLADEGA COLLEGE
REV. F. A. SUMNER, M.A., President

600 students, 40 teachers, 800 acres of land, 20 buildings, electric lights, steam heat, hot and cold water, steam laundry, single beds, good board.
Biological, chemical, physical and agricultural laboratories, library of 16,000 volumes, athletic field, modern hospital.
Special features: Moderate expense, high standards, high-grade instruction, wholesome student spirit, positive Christian atmosphere.
Courses based on Carnegie standards: B.A. degree for courses in Education, Science, Classics. B.D. degree for Theology. Additional courses: Conservatory of Music, Preparatory, Domestic Science, Domestic Arts, Agriculture, Bible Institute, Nurse Training, the Industries.
Graduates prominent in varied activities, and accepted for post-graduate work at Yale, Harvard, and similar institutions.
For catalog and information address
L. T. LARSEN, Dean Room 21, The College Talladega, Alabama

THE FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE
Tallahassee, Florida
Offers long and short courses in Mechanic Arts, in Home Economics, in Agriculture, in Education and in Science.
For Catalog Address
NATHAN B. YOUNG, President
P. O. DRAWER 524

ST. MARY'S SCHOOL
An Episcopal boarding school for girls, under the direction of the Sisters of St. Mary.
Address:
THE SISTER-IN-CHARGE
609 N. 43d St. W. Philadelphia, Pa.

Correct Calling Cards
POPULAR STYLES FOR LADIES OR GENTLEMEN, 100 FOR 50 CENTS OR 50 FOR 30 CENTS, NO EXTRA CHARGE FOR ADDRESS. ALL ORDERS FILLED PROMPTLY. ATTRACTIVE PROPOSITION FOR AGENTS. WRITE FOR SAMPLES AND TERMS
THE HOUSE OF CHOWNING
INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA

ROLAND W. HAYES, Tenor
Recitals  Concerts Oratorio Opera
"An unusually good voice. The natural quality is beautiful. It is a luscious yet manly voice. Mr. Hayes sings freely and with good taste."-Philip Hale, in the Boston Herald.
"A voice of unusual sweetness and calibre.'-Chattanooga Times
Address: 3 WARWICK ST., BOSTON, MASS.

Stenography Typewriting Book-keeping
THE STENOGRAPHERS' INSTITUTE
1. Short Courses in Typewriting
2. Shorthand made as easy as A. B. C.
3. Brief Courses in Practical Book-Keeping
We typewrite Letters, Postal Cards, Wills; fill in Deeds and multigraph Circular Letters cheap.
EDWARD T. DUNCAN, President
1227 SO, 17TH STREET, PHILADELPHIA, PA.

MME. BRIDGES' SCHOOL OF 
French Dressmaking, Ladies' Tailoring and Millinery.
Bridges System.
Special Courses in Designing, Copying, Draping, Making, Trimming, Finishing, Cutting and Fitting.
Special reduction in tuition given to students entering in groups of three or more or to one student taking two or more consecutive courses.
Individual Instruction. A Bridges Diploma means something to you.
448 E. 35th St. Chicago, Ill.

The Colored Teacher
A Practical Educational Journal
containing
A Department of Methods and Practical Helps for Teachers; a Department of Rural Education; and a Department of Current Educational News, conducted by the best trained teachers; besides Editorials, etc. $1.00 per year, 10 cents per copy. Agents wanted.
Address
The Colored Teacher, Box 22, Wilberforce, Ohio.

TEACHERS A live agency furnishes the connecting medium in a business way between teachers and schools and relieves teachers of the embarrassment of job hunting.
We have had calls for teachers from Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Maryland, Mississippi, Missouri, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia and West Virginia.
THE MUTUAL TEACHERS' AGENCY
1408 New York Avenue Washington, D. C.

Mention THE CRISIS

THE CRISIS
Vol. 13.-No. 5  MARCH,1917  Whole No. 77
Editorial
THE WORLD LAST MONTH
ANOTHER revolution in Russia mystifies the world and makes us wonder whether the German menace is to be followed by a Russian menace or no.-"The King of France marched up the hill with twice ten thousand men," and then, under the lead of General Pershing, marched down again from an aimless expedition, with an aimless end, and with only the bravery of the black soldier to save the whole thing from contempt.--Congress is looking for the dishonesty of Business in Politics and is likely to find it despite manifest unwillingness.-At last, over the President's veto, immigration has been restricted chiefly by keeping out those who have not had the opportunity to learn to read and write.--We have embraced new citizens in the Danish West Indies and will place them beside "citizens" in our other island possessions who have responsibilities and no rights.--Cuban Conservatives and American business men are likely to count the Liberals out of power despite the fact that the Liberals evidently won the last election.-And finally, having been lifted on the wings of Peace, we are plunged toward the shadow of the horror of war, nineteen hundred and seventeen years after the birth of the Prince of Peace, and with the churches helpless.
After all Peace is Justice, and Injustice is War, whether it bear belching guns or silent despair.

CIVILIZATION IN THE SOUTH
AN interesting exchange of letters has appeared in the New York Nation in which a Canadian has taken the South severely to task for lynching and for its pretended excuses for lynching. A Texan has hotly replied that the culture of the South must not be accused of dishonesty nor made responsible for southern barbarities. To which the Canadian replies: "If 'editors, preachers, lawyers, teachers, indeed, all the professional classes and all business men of consequence,' are as genuinely indignant as your correspondent supposes, the influence of these persons must be painfully small. And unfortunately it is the common man who counts. It is he who determines the selection of a governor. It is he whose pressure upon the administration decides whether or not the majesty of the law shall be protected. It is he who pours petroleum upon the body of an unpopular Negro. And the whole point of my contention was that the common man of Georgia or Texas has a very different feeling towards the lyncher from that of common men elsewhere."
This brings out the real dilemma of those who would interpret the present South. Is the South a land of barbarism leavened with culture, or a land of culture leavened with barbarism? If we accept the former explanation we can explain lynching. It is a barbaric outburst and survival, and against it the better elements of
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