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40 Teachers and Workers             Over 600 Students
TALLADEGA COLLEGE
Rev. F.A. SUMNER, President        TALLADEGA, ALABAMA
__________________________
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A School for Training Leaders   Positive Christian Influence
EQUIPPED FOR STANDARD WORK IN ALL DEPARTMENTS
Twenty Buildings  Four Laboratories  Modern Hospital
Electric Lights  Library of 16000 Volumes Athletic Field
Steam Heat  Pipe Organ Good Board
Hot and Cold Water  Model Farm  Expense Low
Departments and Courses
Scientific  Bible Institute  Domestic Science and Arts
Classical  Academy  Nurse Training
Theological  Agriculture  Printing 
  For Catalog and Information address
                THE DEAN, Room 21, Talladega, Alabama


The FLORIDA A. & M. COLLEGE
Tallahassee, Florida

   Offers long and short courses in Mechanic Arts, in Home Economics, in Agriculture, in Education and in Science.
For Catalog Address
NATHAN B. YOUNG, President
P. O. DRAWER 524
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ST. MARY'S SCHOOL
  An Episcopal boarding school for girls, under the direction of the Sisters of St. Mary.
Address:
         THE SISTER-IN-CHARGE
609 N. 43rd St.              W. Philadelphia, Pa.
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CLARK UNIVERSITY
ATLANTA, GEORGIA
   Four years Academy or High School.
   Five years Normal Course.
   Two years Pre-Medical Course.
   Four years College (A. B.) Course.
$75 to $125 pays necessary expenses for a year.
   Harry Andrews King, President
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ROLAND W. HAYES, Tenor
Recitals  Concerts  Oratorio  Opera
"An unusually good voice. The natural quality if beautiful. It is a luscious yet manly voice. Mr. Hayes sings freely and with good taste." - Philip Hale, in the Boston Herald.
"A voice of unusual sweetness and caliber."
-Chattanooga Times
Address: 3 WARWICK ST., BOSTON, MASS

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MORGAN COLLEGE AND BRANCHES
John O. Spencer, President.
  MORGAN COLLEGE, Baltimore, Md.
LOCATION: Central, in great college town between North and Sounth
CORUSES: Preparatory, normal, music, advanced education, collegiate,-appropriate degrees.
INSTRUCTORS: College and university trained. Seven colleges and universities represented in faculty.
DORMITORIES: For a limited number, furnished.
TERMS: Very reasonable
DEAN: William Pickens, Lit.D.
  PRINCESS ANNE ACADEMY, Princess Anne, Md.
(The Eastern Branch of the Maryland State College of Agriculture.)
LOCATION: The famous Eastern Shore of Maryland, Somerset County.
COURSES: Preparatory, normal, industrial, domestic science, music
INSTRUCTORS: College and technically trained.
DORMITORIES: Carefully supervised, furnished.
TERMS: Free tuition, other expenses moderate.
PRINCIPAL: Rev. Thomas H. Kiah, A.M.
SUMMER SCHOOL FOR TEACHERS:  June 25th to August 3rd.
  VIRGINIA COLLEGIATE AND INDUSTRIAL INSTITUTION, Lynchburg, VA.
LOCATION: On beautiful hill, suburbs of growing city.
COURSES: Preparatory, normal, domestic science, gardening, music
INSTRUCTORS: College trained, carefully selected
DORMITORIES: Furnished; steam hear; accommodations for fifty girls; carefully supervised.
TERMS: Within the reach of all.
PRINCIPAL: Lee M. McCoy, A.M.
   ALL SCHOOLS OPEN SEPTEMBER 25, 1917

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Stenography      Typewriting      Book-keeping
THE STENOGRAPHERS' INSTITUTE
1. Short Courses in Typewriting
2. Shorthand made as easy as A. B. C.
3. Brief Courses in Practical Book-keeping
We typewrite Letters, Postal Cards, Wills; fill in Deeds and multigraph Circular Letters cheap.
EDWARD T. DUNCAN, President
1227 SO. 17TH STREET, PHILADELPHIA, PA.
_____________________________________________________________
MME. BRIDGES' SCHOOL OF
French Dressmaking, Ladies' Tailoring and Millinery.
Bridges System.
Special Courses in Designing, Copying, Draping, Making, Trimming, Finishing, Cutting and Fitting.
Special reduction in tuition given to students entering in groups of three or more or to one student taking two or more consecutive courses.
Individual Instruction:  A Bridges Diploma means something to you.
448 E. 35th St.                Chicago, Ill.


Mention THE CRISIS


THE CRISIS
Vol/ 14-No.1       MAY, 1917             Whole No. 79

Editorial

A CALL TO COUNSEL.
THE times demand that the leaders of the American Negro counsel together as to the best course of action present and future.  The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People hereby calls a National Conference to meet in the City of Washington May 17 to 19, 1917.  Not only our own branches throughout the land, but organizations of all kinds are asked to send delegates to take counsel with us and to see the award of the Spingarn medal for distinguished achievement during 1916.

A NEW WORD.
WE need a new work in our vocabulary to express that which we formerly expressed by the word "democratic."  That word formerly expressed "respect for the rights of the common people."  It meant sympathy and consideration and justice.  Today the work - both by derivations an actual experience - means the "authority of the people" and it means frequently and ignorant and unjust authority.  To be democratic means merely servile conformity to the will of the majority, even when it is ignorant or unjust, or it means arrogant and intolerant exercise of the political power of the majority.
  We need, therefore, a new word to express that idea of sympathy and consideration for the people which is neither servile or arrogant.  One of our great thinkers, discussing this need, makes these observations as to the type of man which in former times we would have called "democratic" and the new work which we should use to describe him:

"It seems evident that our ethical education must be carried on further than it has been in the past.  The individual conscience must be strengthened and rendered more independent and at the same time it must have more imaginative sympathy so as to realize that public righteousness can only be attained by union with other wills and consciences that are in many ways diverse . . . .
"When one comes to try to indicate a moral attitude which involves the union of a good many qualities which are not usually found together, one has to fall back on a person in whom they were actually united. 'Lincoln-like' comes nearer expressing what we have in mind.  It is no blind following of the will of the majority but it does have a confidence that when a just and reasonable course of conduct is discovered and when time is given for its presentation in the right way the majority of men will approve of it . . . .
"That was Lincoln's attitude when in the Douglass controversy he deliberately shocked the majority of the moment, knowing, also, that what he was doing was 'good politics.' . . . .
"The word 'democratic' is liable to  misconception when used for ideal ends.  What I should like to use would be the word 'socialistic,' if it were not preempted by the Socialists.  The awareness on the part of the individual of his real relations to society as a whole, and his free acceptance of all the responsibilities involved in those relations would make rather a different kind of man."

  The phrase "Lincoln-like," suggested by this writer, expresses the thought I wish to express-"independence," couples with "imaginative sympathy for others."  That is the thought the word "democratic" used to express but now, unfortunately, does not.
       GEORGE G. BRADFORD



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