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[[caption]] The Makah of Washington's Olympic Peninsula make baskets both strong and beautiful by wrapping beach grass around a sturdy framework. Their favorite decorations reflect their coastal home: stylized boats, as here, and whales. [[/caption]]

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[[caption]] The Choctaw of Mississippi make their stout baskets from local cane. Baskets were essential to ancient Choctaw life and death—for sifting and storing their staple, cornmeal, and carrying earth for their enormous burial mounds [[/caption]]

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[[caption]] California and Nevada basketry shows meticulous skill. This large Mono basket holds a spherical Yurok tobacco holder, a Washoe tray, three Pomo baskets and a Paiute bottle. [[caption]]/

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[[caption]] Oklahoma became the home of many tribes forcibly resettled in the 19th Century; as a result its craft tradition is particularly varied. This sampling includes a beaded cradleboard, mats, suede handbags and beaded moccasins. [[/caption]]

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[[caption]] The Cherokees of North Carolina excel in basketmaking and wood carving, skills which they have adapted to modern markets. Here are a basketry wall hanging, carved animals, wastebaskets, bookends and a salad bowl. [[/caption]]

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[[caption]] The Eskimos and Indians of Alaska create delight from materials available in their environment; masks of driftwood, carvings of walrus ivory, covered baskets of baleen. [[/caption]]

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[[caption]] For many people the term Indian crafts means primarily the work of the tribes of the Southwest—items like a Navajo silver necklace, a Hopi Kachina doll, Zuñi turquoise work, or a polished black pot from San Ildefonso. [[/caption]]

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[[caption]] Pictures of a charging horseman, fringe and feathers flying in the wind, fixed a stereotype Indian costume in the minds of Western fans. Actually this regalia belongs only to the Plains—to such tribes as the Sioux and Blackfeet. [[/caption]]

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[[caption]] The Seminoles of Florida were charmed by the white man's patchwork. Now they sew together strips of bright cloth and make the resulting fabric into clothes for men and women. [[/caption]]

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