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00:14:35
00:17:44
00:14:35

Transcription: [00:14:35]

{SPEAKER name="Greg Colfax"}
Well, first I'd like to thank you for listening to our stories. You know, such festive moods.
[00:14:42]

{SPEAKER name="Greg Colfax"}
Our stories often times goes beneath all of that.
[00:14:45]

{SPEAKER name="Greg Colfax"}
The "how" I started is sort of my own life; is something that I have for myself.
[00:14:58]

{SPEAKER name="Greg Colfax"}
The reason "why" I carve is for a lot of different reasons.
[00:15:05]

{SPEAKER name="Greg Colfax"}
I had a lot of encouragement from my grandfather who was a -- who carved, not necessarily masks, like I do.
[00:15:15]

{SPEAKER name="Greg Colfax"}
He claimed he shed to much blood cutting himself to stick with that, so he pretty much stayed with paddles, and design work, and blankets and such.
[00:15:29]

{SPEAKER name="Greg Colfax"}
My own studying of the carvings deals a lot with the Makah Museum because
[00:15:43]

{SPEAKER name="Greg Colfax"}
there's a collector there by Greg Arnold-- collections of slides from museums all across the country that he has visited and taken.
[00:15:54]

{SPEAKER name="Greg Colfax"}
When I first started carving, I was told by those who taught me, duplicate every piece that's made in your village,
[00:16:04]

{SPEAKER name="Greg Colfax"}
and so that's been my goal. -- has been to duplicate them, and in the process of duplicating you -- something happens inside your mind.
[00:16:16]

{SPEAKER name="Greg Colfax"}
It's hard to describe, it's probably something significant in everyone who does that,
[00:16:23]

{SPEAKER name="Greg Colfax"}
but it teaches you something really deeply; something beyond knowledge.
[00:16:31]

{SPEAKER name="Greg Colfax"}
It's just a feeling that you start to have about -- about the world of carving and the world that was it that created it.
[00:16:40]

{SPEAKER name="Greg Colfax"}
So ever since then, I've duplicated every piece that I could get my hands on, which amounted to a little slide.
[00:16:51]

{SPEAKER name="Greg Colfax"}
And so it took hours and hours sometimes to just do a little piece; to figure out how the light reflects on a certain surface; to find out how to cut it;
[00:17:02]

{SPEAKER name="Greg Colfax"}
and then you turn the slide over to see how the other side is,
[00:17:07]

{SPEAKER name="Greg Colfax"}
and that can only take you so far. Your next step is to go to a museum and to look at the actual piece, and to learn from it in that way.
[00:17:19]

{SPEAKER name="Greg Colfax"}
And that's what I -- after seeing a few pieces around here; it's my next step.
[00:17:25]

{SPEAKER name="Greg Colfax"}
Hopefully, these museums would send certain pieces to the -- say, the Neah Bay Museum. or other crafts people and other museums wishing to study -- to receive these pieces like you were talking about.
[00:17:45]


Transcription Notes:
Transcriber didn't read INSTRUCTIONS. Asked for a Review, but had only transcribed. Nothing else was done, except putting the ending Time Stamp at the top of his transcription. So it needs to be all done but the words. Needs punctuation, as well. Speaker 1 - Greg Colfax. Makah Museum at Neah Bay - on the Makah Indian Reservation - Neah Bay, Washington.

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