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00:07:13
00:09:29
00:07:13

Transcription: [00:07:13]
{SPEAKER name="Genevieve Stearns"}
And, we knew that the legs and arms will grow through childhood, much more rapidly than the truck and head grow. And the child has learned to walk, at about a year of age, and he's running around. And it takes a great deal more muscle to hold a little body upright and move it around the room than it for a small baby to lie on its back and wave some very short legs in the air.

[00:07:46]
{SPEAKER name="Genevieve Stearns"}
And, so, during this time, he is growing slowly, he is changing his muscle growth. That's growing very rapidly, far more rapidly than the average person realizes. And he almost, his muscle growth is, amounts to practically half of his total body increase in weight during the first three, during the years from 1 to 4.

[00:08:18]
{SPEAKER name="Genevieve Stearns"}
And if he doesn't get enough protein to make good muscle, then by the time he's 4 years old, his little shoulder blades are sticking out at a sharp angle and he stands with his stomach sticking out in front, what doctors call fatigue posture. But if he gets enough protein, then he maintains a very good body position and is very, very active.

[00:08:49]
{SPEAKER name="Genevieve Stearns"}
Some parents have said to me, "Oh, when we feed them badly-", jestingly, because no one would feed them badly. But a child who is fed, enough protein, has so much more energy and is so much more active than a child who is not fed well. But because these children aren't very hungry, they don't eat a much as they did when they were babies, total food.

[00:09:14]
{SPEAKER name="Genevieve Stearns"}
They're very, and they're very independent. They want to eat it themselves. So families have to compromise and give them things they can eat very easily themselves. Mashed potatoes and gravy, and bread and butter.

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