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2. 

What does this bring us to?

This:

I have made a proposal to the Contemporary Arts Museum of Houston in which I asked them to let me curate a statewide show. They have agreed. The show will open on February 16, 1979.

Now what form is the show to take?

First, I want to have a name for the show. In real it is a Texas survey show but I don't want to call it that. There have been so many shows over the past few years that were called Texas this or Texas that, that I just don't want to stick the word TEXAS in it.

Also, I want the show to have a theme, which is like jumping in a pit of snakes. What theme ties us all together? We have been geographically scattered, split and divided into factional camps, that a Texas look or theme would be hard to pin-point. 

So then, what to call it?

What is the common denominator that will hold us all together?

I have decided to use the theme of fire, and call this show FIRE. 

Fire representing our creative energy. We each have our own brand of fire. Our art is kindling and a necessary component for the cultural glaze. 

A year or so ago, the CAM was struck by a terrible flood. The flood brought destruction and change. Let FIRE be as strong and let the change it brings mark a new beginning. We're coming through the front door.

It has been said before that Texas has all the ingredients for the pie.
  Let the CAM be the oven.
  Let us add the heat.
  As to how the pie will be sliced
     is for the critic to say,
  as to its palatability, that
     is for the public to say.
But as to whether or not there will be any cooking, or anything to slice, is for us to say.

So I am asking you to be a part.
I am asking you to be in the FIRE.

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