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Art of the Southwest.....
Art on the BorderĀ©

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ART AS LANGUAGE: Art of the Southwest Art on the Border

On the Border of What?
1. fringe art
2. marginal art
3. ornamental art
4. art on the verge
5. art on the brink
6. art on the rim
7. art of ethnic minorities

Compound Question by Compounding Border into Border line
1. borderline art
2. intermediate art
3. in between art
4. not quite average art
5. marginal validity art

Do Negative Word Factors Produce Negative Image Responses

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There are essential differences between ART on the Border, ART from the Border and ART of the Border:

ON implies imposition
FROM implies starting point
OF implies native to, endemic, point of origin

To interpret art through language SEE. But if one sees through language, what does it say? In what language? Aesthetics depend on it!

ANTINOMY
Language makes us see Image makes us talk
Aesthetics is dependent on organized sounds - words. Dominant language in a pluralistic society has the power to affect artistic realities.

Art Not Seperate From Words
"I see what you mean"

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ART AS GEOGRAPHY

It is here that geography as Border enters the picture. The landscape clears and the content becomes language in relation to geography. The subject a state of mind.

Geography becomes the terrestrial format for art - an earthwork by default. The land imbues art with its presence in time, space and place.

Art Not a separate reality form society and its territorial imperatives


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LAND

the American Indian realized, too late, doesn't belong to everyone.
Result - Reservation Art
Art with Reservations

CONTROLS

1. economic
2. socio political
3. theology
4. technological
5. linguistic

Land boundaries FRAME the value processes of a given societal order.

Place

Utopia

Pronouncements are about place

Lack of place
Schizothymia

A LAND DREAM
DREAM LAND

Hierarchy of Merits Because of Language

Spanish
Pachuco
English

Barriolese

Aesthetics determined by linguistic Hegemony
subordinate language is equated to banaustic art

MEL CASAS

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Transcription Notes:
Look carefully at each flowchart and there is a small number on the right-upper side in each flowchart.

Please note that the language and terminology used in this collection reflects the context and culture of the time of its creation, and may include culturally sensitive information. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution, but is available in its original form to facilitate research. For questions or comments regarding sensitive content, access, and use related to this collection, please contact transcribe@si.edu.