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THE AMERICAN FEDERATION OF ARTS ANNUAL CONVENTION 
PROGRAM AND SCHEDULE OF EVENTS
Corning Glass Center, Corning, N.Y.
Thursday, October 29 through Saturday, October 31, 1953

AFA CONVENTION COMMITTEE:

Sidney Berkowitz, Chairman
Richard F. Bach
Leslie Cheek, Jr.
James S. Schramm
Lawrence M.C. Smith
Hudson D. Walker
Suzette M. Zurcher

Ex-officio
James Brown
Thomas Brown Rudd
Burton Cumming

Central Theme for Discussion:  "ECONOMIC SUPPORT OF ART IN AMERICA TODAY"

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 29, AFTERNOON:

2:30-5:00  Registration - Library, Corning Glass Center
Conducted tour of Center
5:30-7:00  Cocktails - Center Lounge
7:00-8:15  Informal Dinner - Center Dining Room
(Convention speakers, delegates, Members, and Trustees will be guests of Corning Glass Center for cocktails and dinner)
8:30-10:00  AFA Trustees Meeting - Baron Steuben Hotel
Previews of new art films, Center Auditorium:  Introduced by James Brown, Director, Corning Glass Center.

(Hereafter unless otherwise indicated all meetings and sessions of the Convention will be held in the Small Auditorium of the Glass Center)

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 30, MORNING:

9:00-9:30  Second registration period

9:30-11:00  PANEL I: "The Progress of Art in America"
Convention Chairman & Panel Leader: Sidney Berkowitz, AFA Trustee

First Speaker:  Francis Brennan, Art Advisor to the Editor in Chief of TIME, Inc.  Topic: "The Progress of Art in America"

Second Speaker:  Sidney Berkowitz
Topic: "Why Not an American Fulbright?"

Third Speaker: David Smith, Sculptor
Topic: "The Artist and Art in America"

11:15-12:45  PANEL II: "Community Support of Art"
Topic Speaker & Panel Leader:  Adelyn Breeskin, Director, Baltimore Museum of Art

Second Speaker:  George Rowland, Recent Business Manager, American Museum of Natural History, New York, Topic: "Activities for Income"

Third Speaker:  Edgar C. Schenck, Director, Albright Art Gallery, Buffalo, N.Y.  Topic: (to be announced)
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