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[[underlined]] Catalina [[/underlined]]
Oct. 26. in response to a telegram from Vernon I went in to Los Angeles to meet them on their return from the desert trip.  The next mg. - Sunday - we went to Catalina.  We took the train at the Pacific Electric station where cars start for Pasadena, Mt. Lowe, all the beaches, Santa Ana etc.  The station large enough for a railroad station with big waiting rooms, dining room, etc. and on the barred off entrances to the trains black boards [[image - rectangle shape of black boards]] on which as the train comes a sign appears - next car for Pasadena - or wherever it may be.  Here we took an electric car for San Pedro whose harbor we found with a plenitude of masts, & boarded the Hermosa for the Catalina trip.
It was a pleasant trip across with the ^ [[insertion]] dark [[/insertion]] purple water (out from the green) and the sea birds flying across the prow, the gulls, the flying fish, and the gentle rocking of the boat.  The sea birds were little more than an aggravation - they flew so far away from our sight.
The island as we approached looked like a ^ [[insertion]] short [[/insertion]] range of bare mountains & on reaching it the town proved to be set down in a little flat close to the water's edge with hills rising on all sides.  After lunch we went up on an endless chain ^ [[insertion]] car [[/insertion]] to the top of a hill and down on the other side with the blue water at our feet, so 
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[[underlined]] Catalina [[/underlined]]
close it looked as if the car would drop right into the ocean.  Instead, we stepped out and got into a glass-bottomed [[insertion]] row [[/insertion]] boat. Several of them were waiting for passengers and one that we saw full of people presented a row of ^ [[insertion]] bent [[/insertion]] backs, as all the people were leaning over the glass in the middle. A little awning cut off some of the light and on starting the rower pulled down a flap that cut off a little more.  As we bent over the glasses we saw gold fish swimming around above the rocks, most of which were covered with short whitish or other kinds of weed.  The most beautiful sight of all was the long streamers of brown kelp - some perhaps 40 ft. long - attached to the stones of the bottom and waving gently ^ [[insertion]] back & forth [[/insertion]] through the green water.  One sea weed had purplish flowers that they called 'blue flowers'. Sometimes the kelp rubbed the glass of the boat bottom.  Brown spotted fish swam around and as we moved over the water a big fish with bluish body & white gills came in sight and the rower said he was a sheeps'-head, & said they kept the little fish straight! Schools of little fish from pin size up to purple ones & some that the rower called sardines filled the water in 
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