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a long trip around the world.  Referring to the Scientist he said:  "that he is working for a mistress more exalted than the most demonstrative multitude" He also said that he always has felt like an american citizen but a no time did he feel more so than the day when in succession he was requested to subscribe for the campaign fund of each of the political parties of the United States!
[[underlined]] Vice President Marshall [[/underlined]] made a very tactless ill bred speech, ill adapted for the occasion [[strikethrough]] more like [[/strikethrough]] not knowing that his audience was very unlike to the average lot of political meetings where heretofore he has tried his cheap oratory excepting for this evening was very imposing.
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[[strikethrough]]April 24.[[/strikethrough]] At my table was [[underlined]] Hillebrand, Parsons, [[/underlined]] Prof. Witt. Chicago [[underlined]] Wells [[/underlined]] (Yale) [[underlined]] Franklin[[/underlined]] (Leland Stanford.  Afterwards went to Cosmos Club where Owen was trying to persuade [[underlined]] Weston [[/underlined]] to draft his row with the Bureau of Standards.  Remained till [[strikethrough]] 12 [[/strikethrough]] 1 P.M. with [[underlined]] Cattell[[/underlined]] and [[underlined]]Weston.[[/underlined]]
April 25.  Met Townsend in the morning then drove to Station with Celine.  [[underlined]] James Bryce and [[/underlined]] his wife is leaving too and several ambassadors or diplomatic agents are at station to bid him good bye among them Prussian ambassadors with his hotly dressed Cossack [[underlined]] fur cap [[/underlined]] and poignard.  Very hot!  George Nina and Dorothy Hitchcock were at Penn. station in New York with our motor car.  I went to [[strikethrough]] meeting [[/strikethrough]] dinner of [[underlined]] Inventors Guild [[/underlined]] at Delmonico.  I presented resolution
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