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They had called on us when I was sick, so this was the first opportunity I had of seeing them. The are Scotch, and very friendly. They have a nice house and heaps of new and interesting books. It was a pleasure as well as somewhat of a surprise to meet some one in the W.I.'s who does not serve alcoholic drinks. They admitted that many of the people thought them queer, because they did not indulge, but Mrs Wilson said that the people whom they liked & who liked them came whether they were served drinks or not, and perhaps this method kept many of the more undesirable ones away. The Wilsons have 2 children who are away in Scotland in school. They told us about some of the hurricanes they had been in -- exciting ones they must have been too! We went planning to stay about an hour, and we stayed three. 
We left Montserrat the morning of July 27th. We were told, before going aboard that we would have no cabin.
 
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[[centered, underlined]]Antigua [[centered, underlined/]]

July 27, 1936. Monday. 
Before coming ashore at St. John's we had a most unsatisfactory and hurried lunch. As the boat was crowded we had to eat at second table, and the food was poor as usual. The boat was "Lady Nelson." 
As the boat anchors out quite a distance, one goes in on the Co. launch. We were supposed to start at 2:15, but it was nearer 2:30 when we really got going, and at that we went in very slowly. The fare is 2/ one way 3/ round trip. Baggage is 3d a piece. The boat stops at the Fort swimming beach on the way in to town. 
Dick had already spoken to the harbor master -- Mr Griffiths -- about renting a house at the fort, and Mr Griffiths said he would let us know the particulars when we got ashore. We were doomed to disappointment, as the house has been taken for August, so we had to look elsewhere. 
Never in our lives have we been so beseiged by porters, as when we got on the pier here at St John's. It is in truth a nerve-wracking experience. Dick thought that by going to Bennett-Bryson he would
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