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98 than in Louisiana but since generations the bulk of the money in Louisiana has been invested in Sugar-cane raising and the numerous populations is dependent upon it. Cane here has to be replanted every year. In Cuba it can be cut four years in succession without replanting. Land here seems extraordinarily fertile and easy to cultivate and of course there is no lack of water as in California and it never freezes, as in the North 
Seems to be a poor man's country where a small farmer can make a start with little money, and be neare the market of consumption than on the Pacific or in the West. Seems specially well adapted for early truck-vegetables to be sent to New York, 
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99 Philadelphia, Boston etc. We had a lunch basket on our train. [[strikethrough]] Trip [[/strikethrough]] Finally arrived at Weeks' Island, which is simply a slight elevation in the flat surrounding swampy land. A certain Mr. [[underlined]] Farrell [[/underlined]] a well known lawyer in Louisiana is with us. He explains about salt mine and local conditions. He wss shabbily dressed and of a neglected appearance, but they tell me these are his own peculiarities: He is known thruout South as a brilliant lawyer and man of wide general knowledge. I was convinced of this when he started to talk over the patent-law situation in the United States. A certain Mr. [[underlined]] Myles [[/underlined]], a gentleman of about 65 to 70 years old, white haired and ruddy cheeked and much alive seems to be the president of the Myles Co which exploits the 
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