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like to introduce [[underline in red]] Bakelite Lacquer.  Mr. Patterson [[/underline in red]] is the soul and head of the National Cash Register Co and has developed the enterprise not only to one of the most gigantic manufacturing enterprises of the world but he made it a model plant, inaugurating betterment and social welfare among employees along new lines, instilling civic pride and idealism where formerly [[strikethrough]] there [[/strikethrough]] existed only sordid business surroundings, and exclusive aim for making money.  His plant is now a model plant known all over world. His is an idealist. Introduced also civic reform in the city of Dayton.  Now [[strikethrough]] governd [[/strikethrough]] governed by a new kind of commission plan doing away with the evils
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of low politics and aiming at municipal efficiency.  Mr. West the general manager, took me to lunch in their immense lunch room where all superior employees congregate.  [[strikethrough]] No [[/strikethrough]] Everything is done in a simple, natural, democratic fashion, very direct, decidedly different from that air of patronizing and bootlicking which seemed to exist in Leverkusen or other similar attempts in Europe.  I am told that dividends are only nominal, about 2 1/2% the remainder of profits being returned to reserve fund for further development of the  enterprise.  [[underline in red]] War has affected their sales enormously, [[/underline in red]] a large part of their business being for export.  Williams tells me that [[underline in red]] since the war their sales have dropped 50% from normal. [[/underline in red]]
After visit Dorsey drove me

Transcription Notes:
Leverkusen was a German pharmaceutical company.

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